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Seaweed?

ZefsBuds

Active Member
These babies are at about the 7 day mark. Has anyone used this product/similair product? Any good? Whrn and how to use? Any advice is much appretiated. Thanks
 

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Stunger

Well-Known Member
I regularly added something similar when watering the 3 girls I recently harvested. Mine was a kelp liquid concentrate called 'Seasol' sold in Australia and NZ. I read of quite a few posts of folks using on their gardens. Who can say for sure but I think it helped, my crop seemed to have grown well, I was adding 'worm wee' most days and fish hydrolysate sometimes to the water too. And as @Pbass noted, it is probably a bit early, I'd imagine just water is fine for now while they are small as I assume there would be plenty of nutrients in the soil that would feed the plant for a few days yet. Of course if your soil is barren then maybe yes, but I am sure it wouldn't be.
 

Mastrmasn

Well-Known Member
If the product is just concentrated kelp (seaweed), then its one of the best things you can possibly give your plants. Its not a replacement for nutrients but has its own NPK value and tones of other great stuff.
I'm in LOS and kelp is one of the main ingredients in my soil and feeding regiment. Check out my no till journal. Just cut her down last week and pulled 6.5 oz from the one girl.
 

Bush Doctor 77

Well-Known Member
It's common nomenclature for nutrients. N=nitrogen, P=phosphorus, K=potassium. Usually listed as a percent such as 6-6-6, or 5-8-14. Plants have different requirements depending on growth stage, and method. I saw one seaweed extract that was 0-0-1, which is not enough for growth.
 

AdaminCO

Well-Known Member

Bush Doctor 77

Well-Known Member
I always used kelp/seaweed extracts in my hydroponic growing. The fulvic acid in kelp helps with nutrient uptake, but it’s not really a fertilizer on its own, just a supplement. I wouldn’t put anything on that seedling yet, it looks happy.
Humic and fulvic acids are not nutrients, correct. I grow with hydro using peat/perlite, and the peat is loaded with organic acids.
 

GucciDaGrowman

Active Member
Seaweed contains all major and minor plant nutrients, and all trace elements; alginic acid; vitamins; auxins; at least two gibberellins; and antibiotics.

Of the seaweed contents listed after nutrients and trace elements, the first, alginic acid, is a soil conditioner; the remainder, if the word may be forgiven in this context, are plant conditioners. All are found in fresh seaweed, dried seaweed meal and liquid seaweed extract -- with the one exception of vitamins: these, while present in both fresh seaweed and dried seaweed meal, are absent from the extract. (which might be the same as 'concentrate' but check the label more carefully)

I think seaweed/kelp products are underrated, personally speaking. After introducing it more into various stages of my cycle (root drench before transplant, foliar all of veg + early bloom, neutral feed days) I can say for sure it makes a big difference if used often in low-dosages, to maintain proper growth vigor.

Research & field trials have confirmed the role of kelp in increasing crop yields, drought resistance, frost protection, and stress recovery. Although kelp extracts do contain small amounts of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, & Potassium, their value is not as a fertilizer but as a growth stimulant. They contain potent concentrations of trace minerals, micronutrients, amino acids & vitamins essential to plant growth. But most important, kelp contains many growth hormones, including cytokinins, auxins & gibberellins, which stimulate cell division and larger root systems.

Kelp extracts can be applied as a foliar spray or as a soil soak & are excellent as a root dip for reducing transplant shock. It is important to use recommended rates because these extracts are so potent. Kelp extracts are concentrates which are created quickly with heat, but which can affect the quality of the end product. Cold-processing preserves much higher levels of proteins & growth hormones. Enzymatically digested kelps are even better because their nutrients are in a more readily available form that have not been damaged by heating.

I use Seaweed Bloom (an australian product) for indoor cannabis in veg, and because I live in Los Angeles about 5 miles where we have the worlds tallest kelp forests I head to the beach and collect a 5-gal bucket full of STIPES ONLY (the pneumatocyst doesn't have the same concentration as the stipe in terms of the molecules you are after) to make my own reduction for the first 4 weeks of bloom [I'm on 10 to 11-week bloom for most strains]

For outdoor veggies/fruits I use Maxicrop, it's cheap but it does the trick for outdoors especially well considering the low cost and ease of solubility, I use it at 75-80% suggested strength to make a bag last longer.
 

AdaminCO

Well-Known Member
I use Neptune’s. Stuff is magical in organic grows... I don’t think his product is like a traditional seaweed/kelp though. Did you read the MSDS on it?
 
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