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Smoking Plants that have been treated with Colloidal Silver

Thread starter #1

juz420

Active Member
Hi Guys,
A couple of questions,
If I where to treat only a branch of a female plant with colloidal silver, is it safe to smoke the rest of the plant?
As I understand it, when a plant is treated with colloidal silver, the silver particles bond with copper particles causing stress thus producing female pollen sacs. Is this just local to where the colloidal silver sprayed or is the colloidal silver systemic rendering the whole plant not safe to smoke?
Also would it be safe to make consumables from the treated plant it i.e. oil or butter?

cheers me mateys :)
 

Bonsaiweed

Member of the Month: May 2018
My question:

Will you bet your life, the bud you smoke is clean of colloidal silver? If not, then NO!!

That also goes for edibles in my opinion.

We must remember that when we spray a plant, we don't see everywhere the spray lands on the plant.

My rule in the future with colloidal silver (i haven't used it yet). If I spray a plant, it will not be consumed.
 

Bonsaiweed

Member of the Month: May 2018
From what I've read, and I will state, I haven't read a lot on the consumption of a sprayed plant. The colloidal silver is an immobile chemical. If it were mobile, all the buds would be affected.

Now with that being stated, I know there are people who do consume other buds that haven't been sprayed. Those buds are typically very seed ridden. Also, because you must let the plant mature longer for viable seeds, the buds will be nappy time (most likely).

This is just from information I've read.

I personally wouldn't consume it, but we all take chances based on our bravery. I'm just not that brave. I can wait a month or two if I don't have smoke. I find that better than laying in a morgue.

Keep us informed on your progress.
 
Thread starter #5

juz420

Active Member
Well I know Colloidal Silver has its healing properties and you can consume colloidal silver, but not so sure after it has bonded with copper. That said, if its not systemic or mobile then the consumption "should" be ok on the untreated parts of the plant.
I haven't tried laying in a morgue and I'm hoping not to anytime soon, I think I will wait until my clones are ready for treatment rather than using the plants I flipped last night in my flowering cupboard. I will use whole smaller plants that can be sprayed outside the flowering cupboard isolating them from the others and not worry about consumption etc.
Without solid info i'm guessing it ain't worth it.

It would be good to hear from someone that has though :)

Cheers Juz420
 

TheFertilizer

Well-Known Member
Well, the claim is that it either blocks or binds with ethylene. I haven't heard anything about copper.

I'm not real sure whatever molecular compound ethylene and silver combine to make would be stable or if it would just degrade back to silver, since ethylene is pretty volatile gas. I'm not sure that it actually binds with ethylene or blocks it either. There's not really easily found documentation on that subject.

If you read the MSDS sheet on silver you'll see that it's pretty non-toxic, but it can cause respiratory irritation if you breath the fumes. I think that's more advice regarding slilver solder and probably in large concentrations, but it doesn't say. Keep in mind you're spraying the silver on the plant in minute quantities measured in the parts per million.

Then to top it all off, I've smoked bud sprayed with CS and am here breathing and talking, and really didn't notice anything at all different. I've heard some people say it makes them taste gross, but I think that depends on if you leave a lot of the silver nitrate on ( the silverish dust). It tasted and smoked like regular bud to me.

I'd take the advice of people telling you not to dare smoking it with a grain of salt. Honestly they seem like they're coming from the Chicken Little, "Oh my god it's a chemical!" approach. It's just silver suspended in water. Your concern of what it becomes if it binds with ethylene is more prudent since there's no MSDS we can find for that, and really no documentation to say for sure that's what the silver is doing.

Anyway, long story short, I smoked some that had been sprayed with CS, I didn't notice anything different.
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
I work with silver a lot. It's considered one of the few nontoxic metals we have.
People will always have subjective opinions about this stuff. That's all good. But it's best to be rational and try to do some research about the science of the issue before pushing fear of an unknown on to others.
Personally I would not worry about smoking parts of a plant that have had other parts of it sprayed with a very weak silver solution. Lets assume you end up smoking some tiny dissolved trace of silver. So what? I've never been able to find any info about silver giving off toxic elements when heated. Have you? There's basically no data anywhere to say that silver is toxic.
Don't want to risk it? Totally understandable and I completely support you, but it may be based more on fear of the unknown, or personal/spiritual beliefs (I have those too) than on any real rational argument or actual scientific information.
Which is fine. But it is more personal choice than accepted fact.

Anyway, long story short, I smoked some that had been sprayed with CS, I didn't notice anything different.
 
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Thread starter #8

juz420

Active Member
My fear is from only what I have read on some forums. I have good reason to suspect that the information provided is only assumptions as no reasoning or scientific data has been provided other than statements that its bad for you to both smoke or consume. I suppose its better to err on the side of caution than to give bad advice when you don't have the real answers. The fact that you can consume Colloidal silver for its health benefits has made me wonder why you couldn't at least consume the plant as opposed to smoking it unless there is some chemical reaction that we don't know about. Personally I would take the risk of consumption and now that I've heard from you guys who are clearly alive and hopefully well, I wouldn't be too concerned about the potential of smoking a little bit of over sprayed CS. In the meantime I might see if I can find any data regarding fumes from burning Silver even if it is in tiny amounts.

Thanks for your replies guys!! I will report back anything I find :)
Cheers
-Juz420
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
Yeah please do report back if you find anything.
It's funny how often you find the Chicken Little stuff on forums. A lot of opinions just get repeated in dire tones. I guess we just really really care about each other's safety? Or maybe people really are just more frightened than they seem to be in other contexts.
I figure if I'm smoking weed at all then I'm facing more important health risks than that potential trace amount of silver. Like for example- smoke.
Silver doesn't smoke well. I haven't tried rolling up a joint of it but I expect if I did I'd mainly be smoking paper, a little butane, maybe a speck or two of extraneous junk like a bit of hair or plastic...
I think it falls in a category where It would be unethical to give the weed to other people without first telling them it had possible silver contact. People like to make their own choices-
 
Thread starter #10

juz420

Active Member
Here is an interesting article I found :- Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program
It would seem you would need copious amounts of silver for it to have any adverse affects, even long term exposure rarely has an affect. It looks as though this subject has been discussed a number of times, the last post on this Discussion kind of closed the argument.
The only thing that I can't find is what element or compound the silver may bind or bond with when introduced to the plant. It would seem that Silver can have adverse affects when part of a compound, in particular when bonded to nitrates or sodium, but at the level we are talking at its no more dangerous than smoking a cigarette.
Cheers,

Juz420
 
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Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
I apprentice under a jeweller working mainly with silver. She's done it for over 50 years as has one of our co-workers. There is certainly about as much silver dust around as I could ever reasonably expect any person to ever be exposed to under semi-normal conditions. Definitely no argyria here. It must take some really extreme conditions- like I'm envisioning prolonged exposure in a a third world factory environment...
 

Bonsaiweed

Member of the Month: May 2018

TheFertilizer

Well-Known Member
I apprentice under a jeweller working mainly with silver. She's done it for over 50 years as has one of our co-workers. There is certainly about as much silver dust around as I could ever reasonably expect any person to ever be exposed to under semi-normal conditions. Definitely no argyria here. It must take some really extreme conditions- like I'm envisioning prolonged exposure in a a third world factory environment...
From what I read it was most common in affluent and wealthy family due to their use of silver in dining ware. Supposedly this is where the term "blue bloods" came from.
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
I'll ask my mentor about it when I get a chance and report back. Really hard to believe that anyone could have such a silvery lifestyle that they actually turned blue. I've been subjected to over a decade of silver dust storms and I'm still poor and white. Though I always did have a thing for Smurfette. Would she go for me ...?
Atter working with it a bunch I notice the black colour from the dust when I blow my nose. But never any blue.
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
I talked to my friends. Over five decades of near constant silver exposure and they've seen not a trace of any blue-ing other than apparently one time when one of them spilled blue koolaid on herself. Also they've never heard of any cases of it at all in silversmithing circles.
Wikipedia has no mention of the silverware connection. They mainly refer to cases among people who like to guzzle colloidal silver.
Pretty safe to say smoking a treated plant won't make you turn blue. Scratch that off the list I guess
Are we getting anywhere...