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South Africa, Opportunity & Threats: Where is this legislation process taking us and what can be done to maximize opportunity for all?

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
I wonder if anyone might know something that could point me in the right direction. I am quite aghast at the pace at which dagga legislation is picking up speed, and alarmed by the trajectory it appears it is taking. I have been watching Fields Of Green For All (FOGFA) for a while, and I think that they are possibly self-interested parties, who have become self-appointed public advocates and are promoting certain kinds of legislation, which is moving quite quickly I think. They sell the right to access to their information via membership fees. On May 24th the Goverment Gazette published a notice about CBD and THC content that I don't completely understand but it worries me that even private users may be prevented from using THC legally, beyond certain levels. There's a lot to be very concerned about in my view. Small-scale farmers should be empowered now and have access to finance, to improve income at household level, and to generate capital for local economic development. But, I worry that over-licensing and over-regulating is going to see the same economic divide perpetuate, as big-agri and big-pharma sweeten the government to their own ends. As far as I am aware, there has not yet been a transparent consultative process, I am not reading stories about research that projects income growth and economic development for the man in the street who might become a canna-entrepreneur. Do you know of anything by any chance? I feel that there is a steam train that needs to be stopped, and fast...
let us focus on local economic development and private usage
 

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irie lion

Nug of the Month: May 2019
Hey sister Carmen :ganjamon: Things are getting very blurry regarding grow licensing, looks like there's loads of corruption & politics involved and it's not going to turn out well for the cannabis industry in South Africa unfortunately.

Google this:
"South Africa's Secret Legal Medical Cannabis Farm" - dodgy shit. From there you'll find a couple more articles that may piss you off lol.
Hope you're having a lekker evening :48:
 

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
Hey sister Carmen :ganjamon: Things are getting very blurry regarding grow licensing, looks like there's loads of corruption & politics involved and it's not going to turn out well for the cannabis industry in South Africa unfortunately.

Google this:
"South Africa's Secret Legal Medical Cannabis Farm" - dodgy shit. From there you'll find a couple more articles that may piss you off lol.
Hope you're having a lekker evening :48:
Hey Brotha Irie, I have known about the one at uShaka at the trade port for a long time, but was of the understanding that they were growing high end thc strains? I also know about the Lesotho one, owned by Bophelo Bioscience and Wellness (Pty) Ltd. It was a no brainer to put money on government greed and corruption, but I don't know how two wit ous gain celebrity and funding enough from a freaking arrest, to maneuver themselves into a position of influence in our tanking economy. They have no right. They have no mandate. We do things differently in South Africa. Politics here is meant to ensure that people at local and branch level can mobilize their Councillors to advocate on their behalf. So, the structures have eroded significantly in a couple of decades and we are where we are. At least the Mandela and Mbeki governments gave much consideration to stimulatory projects and initiatives that would give rise to local economic development. They don't have a saak for that anymore. My career has been in NGOs dedicated to economic improvement for the poorest of the poor, but I was made redundant because NGO funding was diverted to government after 94. After that, I just got contract work around the time of every election... basically research interventions for LED, but without being funded after elections.... so literally selling communities a bunch of lies to garner votes for the ruling party. We have so much intelligence and experience here in the field of local economic development. What should happen is that there should be a legally constituted public consultation process nationwide, like they do on all other big issues affecting our livelihoods. Researchers should be conducting field research in a cross-section of localities, to get indications of how potential stake holders see opportunity in the sector for themselves, some demographic measurements for development purposes, and a critical examination of the opportunities and threats in the broader economic development framework. Then, finance should be made accessible, and training made available. The government could provide specialist extension farm officers, to assist with co-operatives etc. Africa has a long history of community engagement and collective effort. It feels like we are losing this ability to mobilize as citizens. If we lose this window of opportunity, then we only have ourselves to blame quite honestly. If we hand our decisions over to the authorities we will lose our freedoms one by one. The Dagga Couple should focus on keeping themselves and their members out of jail, but they have no clue how to develop an economy and I resent their interference in policy making. I am talking to former colleagues to see if there is anything that can be done to make our objections heard and felt, backed up by solid research and public consultation... ja boet... I am trying to still the anger... it's making me physically ill.... years of our people being fucked over by self-serving interests :ganjamon::Rasta::48:
 

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
Policy must be inclusive and it must not be over-regulated. Anyone should have access to the market if they are of legal age. There should not be a single issue of licenses, and licenses should take different forms and be available ad infinitum to any small business owner who wishes to participate in the formal economy. There should not be a single price point for licenses. Only the medical industry should be heavily regulated and by science.
 

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
Question: What good reason would we want out collaborative efforts scrutinized by government agents, in terms of stock take, book keeping, and other records, unless we are growing for a corporate?... #NoToPrivateCannabisClubbyThingy FOGFA are trying to regulate this, and what concerns me, is that the legal language might exclude from legal activity, those of us who choose not to open our lives to the cops.... don't let them do this again / green gold ... don't let them take away my window weed :lot-o-toke: or my apothecary :lot-o-toke: or my friends :lot-o-toke:
 

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
In my view, the FOGFA Proposal For The Legal Regulation Of Cannabis In South Africa reads like a slick marketing brochure for a regulatory body. It conflates a whole lot of puff and ignores salient points. It over complicates something very simple. Yes, there is a medical industry, and we certainly do not need to advocate for it, as it is pretty well resourced. They will be regulated, as will their licensed growers and suppliers. Moving t.f. on!
We, The People.... have the right to participate in an enabling economic environment that has a people centred, development focus. We, The People, refuse to be regulated out of economic opportunities that come from the cultivation, production and distribution of cannabis. Let us stop referring to it as the Cannabis Industry. We, The People, want the right to grow our produce to whatever standard we wish, and allow the market to regulate itself. If you are concerned about BEEE, you can't get more "beee" than LED!
 

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
An apology: I posted a thread with a link to a social media page that I have started, not realizing that I was breaking site rules. Sorry for doing that.

A word about me and my use of social media. I guess my activities have some people worried about confidentiality and all that stuff. I understand if my friends here feel the need to pull back from interaction with me. That's ok; I do want to assure you that I don't want any risks that I am potentially taking to harm others.

I reactivated my dormant facebook account to launch a social media campaign (I actually loathe facebook and this is a necessary evil for me). The page will offer people a place to find information as it builds up, and contribute to public debate if they wish. There is a private working group that people like me can apply to join, but they have to answer three questions, and then on acceptance, have to introduce themselves and issue a statement of intention for their contribution to the campaign.

I have made a little bit of sound on Youtube, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and Facebook. If this can get off the ground, we will assemble a team of specialist researchers and development planners, who are linked by their ethics and commitment to our country and the people of our country, and their decades of service to the development sector both here and abroad. This is not a funded initiative, so people are asked to volunteer skills and time to organizing an effective campaign. If we need to take it to the streets, we will need people who are experienced in those kinds of negotiations and who can rally stakeholders together for a march (no easy task). I would like to get a formal petition going, and a critical article written by a media heavyweight if possible. I have approached two media gurus in my private capacity and I await their responses. Then, I have contacted Thembela Kepe and I await his response. Our team will analyze existing research and propose a way forward in that regard. An intervention like this will only work if it is an organized, multi-faceted campaign backed by a lot of South Africans who are willing to show their faces at a march and take some risks.

The future hasn't happened yet. We, yes we, are all in the process of either making it happen, or allowing it to happen. We have the right to organize ourselves and protest. We have the right to initiate change for the better.
 
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Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
Greetings. The South African Cannabis Advocacy page has generated a following of over 700 people in less than 3 days. I submitted a proposal to the editor of a political journal, and he has told me that he is going to publish extracts. I am in conversation with a local NGO who are already working with some Rasta groups in this regard. I have had correspondence from the CEO, who will set up a meeting with me. There is healthy, constructive engagement on the fb page, and there have been private messages with individuals too. I am in conversation with several development consultants who are friends and former colleagues. There is every indication that this campaign, launched a couple of days ago, is gathering interest, commitment and momentum. :thumb::thumb::thumb:
 

Carmen Ray

Well-Known Member
That was the most insane thing I have ever done. I am hanging back now. I grew up in an activist family and I'm getting old. I don't want to see my country tank. I want to see it prosper before I die #freetheweed I have deleted social media apps off phone and computer.... I got quite a few people into a space, so now I am going to go back to the garden. I don't have the stomach for this.... I just hope that enough people will talk sense with one another and push back.... night night :bong:
 
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