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SweetSue's Cannabis Oil Study Hall

Oldbear

Well-Known Member
Fractionated coconut oil, also called “liquid coconut oil,” fit our requirements. Basically, it is a form of the oil that has had the long-chain fatty acids removed via hydrolysis and steam distillation. Just this one change makes the oil liquid at room temperature, and extends the product’s shelf life.

There are three basic types of fatty acids—short-chain, medium-chain, and long-chain. Long-chain fatty acids have more carbon atoms, which means they require higher temperatures to melt. Fats that are solid at room temperature have longer chain lengths—thus, coconut oil.

HOW DOES IT BECOME LIQUID?
One of the fatty acids that’s mostly removed in fractionation is lauric acid—a type of “healthy” saturated fat found in high quantities in coconut and palm kernel oils. It’s a great fat to have in skin care because it’s so moisturizing and cleansing. Removing it, though, gives us the liquid product we need to use in items like our Herbal Facial Oils.

WHAT'S LEFT?
Once the lauric acid and other long-chain fatty acids are gone, you’re still left with a lot of good stuff, including medium chain fatty acids like capric, caprylic, myristic and palmitic, all of which retain their super-moisturizing capabilities. You also still have the natural antioxidants, which protect from environmental stressors, and nutrients like vitamins A, C, and E, which help maintain a tighter, firmer look.

THE PERFECT CARRIER OIL
Fractionated coconut oil is completely soluble with other oils, which makes it the perfect carrier oil, capable of ushering other oils into the skin. It’s also extremely light, and absorbs quickly into the skin without clogging pores. You’re left with a soft, smooth feeling that won’t exacerbate oiliness or leave you feeling greasy.
 

Cannasavvy

Well-Known Member
Fractionated coconut oil, also called “liquid coconut oil,” fit our requirements. Basically, it is a form of the oil that has had the long-chain fatty acids removed via hydrolysis and steam distillation. Just this one change makes the oil liquid at room temperature, and extends the product’s shelf life.

There are three basic types of fatty acids—short-chain, medium-chain, and long-chain. Long-chain fatty acids have more carbon atoms, which means they require higher temperatures to melt. Fats that are solid at room temperature have longer chain lengths—thus, coconut oil.

HOW DOES IT BECOME LIQUID?
One of the fatty acids that’s mostly removed in fractionation is lauric acid—a type of “healthy” saturated fat found in high quantities in coconut and palm kernel oils. It’s a great fat to have in skin care because it’s so moisturizing and cleansing. Removing it, though, gives us the liquid product we need to use in items like our Herbal Facial Oils.

WHAT'S LEFT?
Once the lauric acid and other long-chain fatty acids are gone, you’re still left with a lot of good stuff, including medium chain fatty acids like capric, caprylic, myristic and palmitic, all of which retain their super-moisturizing capabilities. You also still have the natural antioxidants, which protect from environmental stressors, and nutrients like vitamins A, C, and E, which help maintain a tighter, firmer look.

THE PERFECT CARRIER OIL
Fractionated coconut oil is completely soluble with other oils, which makes it the perfect carrier oil, capable of ushering other oils into the skin. It’s also extremely light, and absorbs quickly into the skin without clogging pores. You’re left with a soft, smooth feeling that won’t exacerbate oiliness or leave you feeling greasy.
Great explanation.
 

medmanmike

Well-Known Member
Fractionated coconut oil, also called “liquid coconut oil,” fit our requirements. Basically, it is a form of the oil that has had the long-chain fatty acids removed via hydrolysis and steam distillation. Just this one change makes the oil liquid at room temperature, and extends the product’s shelf life.

There are three basic types of fatty acids—short-chain, medium-chain, and long-chain. Long-chain fatty acids have more carbon atoms, which means they require higher temperatures to melt. Fats that are solid at room temperature have longer chain lengths—thus, coconut oil.

HOW DOES IT BECOME LIQUID?
One of the fatty acids that’s mostly removed in fractionation is lauric acid—a type of “healthy” saturated fat found in high quantities in coconut and palm kernel oils. It’s a great fat to have in skin care because it’s so moisturizing and cleansing. Removing it, though, gives us the liquid product we need to use in items like our Herbal Facial Oils.

WHAT'S LEFT?
Once the lauric acid and other long-chain fatty acids are gone, you’re still left with a lot of good stuff, including medium chain fatty acids like capric, caprylic, myristic and palmitic, all of which retain their super-moisturizing capabilities. You also still have the natural antioxidants, which protect from environmental stressors, and nutrients like vitamins A, C, and E, which help maintain a tighter, firmer look.

THE PERFECT CARRIER OIL
Fractionated coconut oil is completely soluble with other oils, which makes it the perfect carrier oil, capable of ushering other oils into the skin. It’s also extremely light, and absorbs quickly into the skin without clogging pores. You’re left with a soft, smooth feeling that won’t exacerbate oiliness or leave you feeling greasy.
OB, great info - thanks for sharing!
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016

Cannasavvy

Well-Known Member
So, after using the salves made from the two differwnt batches (lecithin pre vs post infusion) I didnt notice any difference in effectivity or texture. The total cannabinoid dose may be high enough that the difference is negligible in this case. 120 mg per ml vs 99 mg per ml. I just wanted to update.
 

Cannasavvy

Well-Known Member
Making new salve experiment today.
Here are my ingredients:







Here are the heated phase ingredients being melted together in a water bath.


Here is the cool down phase ready to add in a nifty silicone pinch bowl.

Here is the poured salve ready to go in the freezer. Please note this is at home, not work.

Pain salve

Heated phase:

162.5 g hemp oil
120 g beeswax
30 g candelila wax
150 g infused cannabis oil, with lecithin
2 g cbd shatter

Cool down phase:

2.5 g bisabolol
5 g cinnamon bark oil
2.5 g clove bud oil
5 g lavender oil
1.5 g peppermint oil
4 g cedarwood oil
1 g wintergreen oil
20 g carrot seed oil.

Basically, melt together heated phase, remove from heat, add cool downn phase, mix well, pour, freeze, cap and label. Be sure to date everything you make.:)



Finished salve and label.
 
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Dave Groomer

Well-Known Member
Making new salve experiment today.
Here are my ingredients:







Here are the heated phase ingredients being melted together in a water bath.


Here is the cool down phase ready to add in a nifty silicone pinch bowl.

Here is the poured salve ready to go in the freezer. Please note this is at home, not work.

Pain salve

Heated phase:

162.5 g hemp oil
120 g beeswax
30 g candelila wax
150 g infused cannabis oil, with lecithin
2 g cbd shatter

Cool down phase:

2.5 g bisabolol
5 g cinnamon bark oil
2.5 g clove bud oil
5 g lavender oil
1.5 g peppermint oil
4 g cedarwood oil
1 g wintergreen oil
20 g carrot seed oil.

Basically, melt together heated phase, remove from heat, add cool downn phase, mix well, pour, freeze, cap and label. Be sure to date everything you make.:)



Finished salve and label.
Cajun always said Lecithin is wasted on topicals. No need to increase bioavailability for topicals.:circle-of-love::peace:
 

Cannasavvy

Well-Known Member
I gathered them over time and decided on my personal favorites and what seems most effective. The freezer is great for storing any exotic oils you may not use quickly. Most oils freeze very well.
There is so much we dont know. I like lecithin in topicals for the skin feel it contributes and just a little (3%) can keep the salve more spreadable. Do we really know bioavailability wont be improved topically with lecithin? We still want to absorb the cannabinoids as effectively as possible. I have decided to add lecithin to all my oil batches for simplicity and convenience. One bottle of lecithin lasts me a LOOONG time and its relatively cheap and im pretty sure its not hurting anything, so im going to keep at it.
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
If there wasn’t a usefulness to lecithin in a topical you wouldn’t see it used so widely in the cosmetics industry.
 

Cannasavvy

Well-Known Member
Just out of curiosity, have you tried the cream with and with out the lecithin? If so, do you notice a difference? :circle-of-love::peace:
Yes, it definitely makes a difference. Took awhile for me to figure it out, but i like the results. The salve sets up very solid but liquefies at body temp more easily i find. The effect is even more pronounced if you use any castor oil in your product. Gives a more vaseline like consistency.
I like it at 3% in my oil infusions, then i use that in the salve as a main oil. still playing with ratios. the more you add the softer the resulting salve.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Gadfly here!
We still want to absorb the cannabinoids as effectively as possible.
The addition of any waxes prevents the effective absorption of anything you put in them. Waxes stay on the skin...it's their purpose, to seal the pores.
If there wasn’t a usefulness to lecithin in a topical you wouldn’t see it used so widely in the cosmetics industry.
Nothing in the cosmetic industry is designed to be absorbed by the skin (unless you're speaking specifically of wrinkle creams - do they contain lecithin as well?).
 
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SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Gadfly here!

The addition of any waxes prevents the effective absorption of anything you put in them. Waxes stay on the skin...it's their purpose, to seal the pores.

Nothing in the cosmetic industry is designed to be absorbed by the skin (unless you're speaking specifically of wrinkle creams - do they contain lecithin as well?).
I'm not a woman who knows anything at all about cosmetics from personal experience, but I do know that lecithin is used as a moisturizing agent in creams for damaged skin conditions like eczema.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
I wonder if it would be a good ingredient to add to the stems/leaves salve then...that's the one I use on skin conditions as opposed to pain.
Sounds like a plan.

May I ask what’s different about that salve? What measurements of stems and leaves do you use as opposed to one with only buds?
 
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