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SweetSue's Class Notes

Thread starter #321

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016

Ah Warner has insight into terpenes for topicals. She's the woman who got it written into Washington State law that topicals could be sold in any store that wanted to sell them, and where I learned that b-caryophyllene and linalool will improve the skin absorption of cannabis topicals by creating a transdermal effect. In her opinion it's not worth dealing with DMSO when terpenes already available in canna is will do the job for targeted relief with topicals.

I'll pick up the comments later. This is a panel I've been meaning to dissect for quite some time. She also mentioned high mrycene and high limonene, but my notes were sketchy.
 
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Thread starter #322

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
From Prof of Pot. I brought it here so I wouldn’t have to go looking for it again.

Thank you m’lord. This is a crash course on eCBs. :yahoo:



7 Things You Never Knew About Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors

The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is more complex than the “lock and key” model lets on. Here are 7 facts that everyone should learn.

The “lock and key” model is often used to explain interactions between receptors and their ligands. The CB1 receptor is like the “lock” which is activated by a single “key” such as THC.

While this analogy may be useful for someone new to pharmacology, it is incredibly oversimplified. After reading the 7 facts below, you will be able to appreciate how complex CB1 receptors really are.
And just for fun, let’s see how long we can keep the lock and key analogy going…

1. The CB1 Receptor is Found in Unexpected Places
You expect to find locks on a car door, but not necessarily under the hood inside the engine.

Mitochondria in green [NICHD]The classical view of the CB1 receptor is that it is expressed on the cell surface and its function is to bind a ligand on the outside of the cell and generate a signal on the inside of the cell.

If this were true, then what the *#%! is the CB1receptor doing inside the cell on the mitochondria? This is still being worked out, but by regulating cellular energetics, mitochondrial CB1 receptors may influence memory, and a variety of other brain and bodily functions.


2. The CB1 Receptor Is Always Turned On
It is one of those chain locks that allow the door to be like 10% open, but still secure.
Another outdated model is that the CB1receptor is completely “off” until an endocannabinoid or THC turns it on. Wrong again! The CB1 receptor has what is called constitutive activity. It has a basal level of signaling even in the absence of any ligand that regulates release of neurotransmitters such as GABA.
Drugs called inverse agonists are capable of blocking constitutive activity. They tested a CB1inverse agonist called rimonabant and it produced serious psychiatric issues such as anxiety and depression in some people. It turns out that constitutive activity is important!

3. THC Is A Partial Agonist of the CB1Receptor…Until It’s Not
THC can open a locked door part way, but sometimes it just gets stuck so that better keys can’t open it.

You may have read that THC is a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor. This means that it activates the CB1 receptor, but not all the way. Although this is true in isolated cells, it does not always work that way in real life.
The effects of THC depend on the CB1 receptor density, coupling efficiency, and presence of endocannabinoids that are even stronger CB1receptor agonists. In the right context, THC can actually act like an antagonist and reduce activation of the CB1 receptor.

4. The CB1 Receptor Can Generate Multiple Signals
Sometimes the CB1 receptor opens a door to one hallway, but sometimes the same door leads to a different hallway. We are all in the Twilight Zone.
The old model of the CB1 receptors was that it could activate a single signaling pathway within a cell. Whether it was being activated by THC, an endocannabinoid, or a synthetic cannabinoid didn’t really matter.
Now we know better… not only can the CB1receptor activate different signaling pathways, but different ligands can selectively activate one pathway over the other. This phenomenon is called biased agonism, and opens the possibility of activating the pathways most beneficial for certain conditions while reducing side effects.

5. The CB1 Receptor Gets Around With Other Receptors
Two locks come together and you have to turn multiple keys at the same time as if you were launching nuclear missiles.

Another limitation of the lock and key model is that it shows each lock working independently. Nothing could be further from the truth! The CB1 receptor is floating in a lipid membrane where it can directly interact with many other receptors. In fact, the CB1 receptor can interact with at least 10 other receptor types.
The receptors in each heterodimer pair can modulate each others function in various ways. This is one mechanism of how the cannabinoid system interacts with the opioid system, the serotonin system, the dopamine system, and various others. Let’s not even get into the issue that CB1 may get down with multiple other receptor types at the same time (insert polyamorous joke here).

6. The CB1 Receptor Can Quickly Be Downregulated
If you unlock the door too many times, the keyhole disappears.
Consuming THC multiple times can cause tolerance to its effects. One of the way this happens is through receptor endocytosis – cells literally swallowing the receptor into itself so that there is less of it at the cell surface.
But here’s an interesting twist – CB1 receptor downregulation does not happen equally in all brain areas. This may explain why you can develop tolerance to some effects of THC more than others.

7. Not All CB1Receptors Are the Same
There are many different brands of locks.

Finally, your CB1 “lock” is not mass produced. The CB1 receptor is highly polymorphic, meaning that there is a lot of genetic variation in its DNA sequence. The CB1 receptor that you have is not necessarily the same as that of your neighbors.
Although not all CB1 genetic polymorphisms have functional consequences, several CB1polymorphisms affect expression or signaling. Pharmacogenetic studies have linked these to psychiatric, cardiovascular, and inflammatory conditions and how you respond to THC.
 
Thread starter #324

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Oh........ that deserves another hug. :5::5::5::5::5:
 
Thread starter #325

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Thread starter #326

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
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SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
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SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Watching the video by Jonathan Treasure explaining why he wrote his book I was struck by this statement:

“There are no manuals, no cliff notes, and getting things wrong can have serious consequences.”

And I thought, “But this is cannabis, not some synthetic pharmaceutical. With a little attention and practice you can whip the essentials up in your kitchen.”

I started out excited about the book. Now I’ll likely include it in my reference library, but you know what I think would be interesting?

A thread on our personal regimens. The fine details of how we as a community use cannabis to improve the quality of our lives. Chemovars, doses, schedules, the history of how we got from the intimidating beginnings to the satisfied balance of systems, or at the very least something we’re comfortable with, what brings relief.

All rolled together in one long thread that we can mine for patterns, watch for the unexpected. Gosh..... tell me that doesn’t just give you chills of excitement thinking of what we might learn? :slide:

We must be getting close to this thread. It’s becoming more forceful. Lol!

Too many of us are still treating chronic pain with inhalation. An inefficient response in a community this educated. Maybe if we share it ‘round a table it’ll be easier to shift perceptions and get better relief.
 
Thread starter #329

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Apoptosis: cellular suicide, caused by a release of ceramide, which initiates a disassembly of the core components (mitochondria) and structural integrity of the cellular membrane.

The amount of ceramide released is in proportion to the number of receptors available for cannabinoids to activate.

Cancer cells have one profound difference (among others) between them and neighboring, healthy cells...... they express more CB1 receptors. :4:

Also.....

 
Thread starter #330

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Thread starter #331

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
It’s time to get this transferred to digital. I’ll drop it here and transcribe later.





From


How it works: Cancer

CBD: Lowers response of ID-1 gene, restricting the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. High levels of ID-1are found in brain, liver, skin, and thyroid gland cancer cells. It is also expressed in fetal cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

Cannabidiol as a major component of the cancer treatment protocol
* Non-small cell lung cancer
* Gastric Cancer
* Breast cancer
* Prostate cancer
* Melanoma
* Glioblastoma
* Hepatocarcinoma
* Anaplastic thyroid tumor
* Metastasis of certain cancers

If you’re treating any of these cancers you can start out with higher CBD:THC ratios to hopefully stop metastasis and proliferation.

After reviewing patient history and questionnaire determine
* dose goal
* terpene and cannabinoid profiles and ratios

Cannabis dosing defies conventional approaches.
* Age is more a determination than weight
* youngest patients took highest doses for Glioblastoma
* oldest patients took the highest doses

Dose chart: Glioblastoma

88-yr old male(63kg) - 75:30 (ablue Dream: ACDC)

58-yr old male (84kg) - 350:100 (Candyland:ACDC)

54-yr old male (59kg) - 300:100 (Blue Dream: Valentine X)

23-yr old male (84kg) - 300:100 (XJ13:ACDC)

61-yr old female (55kg) - 1000:200 (Blue Dream: Valentine X)

50-yr old female (77kg) - 150:50 (XJ13:ACDC)

28-yr old female (63kg) - 200:100 (Berry OG:ACDC)

3-yr old female (18kg) 409:350 (Sour Diesel: ACDC)


Breast Cancer

45-yr old female (63kg) - 250:250 (Sour Diesel:ACDC)

47-yr old female (59kg) - 100:100 (Sour Diesel: ACDC)

43-yr old female (61kg) - 159:150 (Sour Diesel:Valentine X)

44-yr old female (71kg) - 150:75 (Pepe le Pu:ACDC)

57-yr old female (57kg)* - 30:100 (Pepe me Pu:ACDC)

35-yr old female (57kg)* - 30:15 (Sour Diesel:ACDC

* only wanted to treat side effects, not cure


Questions For The Patient

* What’s the diagnosis?

* What’s the current cannabis use and experience?

* What pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals are you on?

CBD will interfer with the CP450 pathway and will potentially cause certain medicines to build up to dangerous levels. Any medicine that cautions you against grapefruit juice is suspect and serum levels should be monitored more closely if using CBD.

*What’s your age?

* What’s your objective? What are you trying to accomplish?
 
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Thread starter #332

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016

Clinical Applications of Cannabinoids and terpenes
Mara Gordon - Cannafest 2015, Prague
Some basic Terpenes

* Pinene - Elevates the mind, sharpens focus (can cause anxiousness if sensitive)

* Linalool- analgesic, anti-anxiety (found in lavender)

* B- Caryophyllene - most abundant in Ashanti peppers
- Look for it in purple chemovars.
- On its own this terpene will activate CB2 receptor sites without interfering with THC uptake the way CBD will.
- Look for chemovars high in b-caryophyllene when treating diseases with lots of CB2 receptor sites.

Myrcene - found in mangos and hops
- improves bioavailability by helping Cannabinoids pass more efficiently through the BBB
- has sedative effect
- found in higher concentrations in plants we think of as indicas
- helpful when dealing with a number of chronic diseases (chronic disease typically has lots of inflammation)

Limonene - found in lemons and other citrus fruits
- good for acid reflux
- effective anti-anxiety choice
- can be used to treat depression with good effect
- On some airlines first-class passengers are offered cloths soaked in lemon water to wipe the face and hands.

Cannabis is such effective medicine in part because of the entourage effect, that synergistic dance of cannabinoids and the terpenes that direct their action creating a medicine that's more potent together than any of the components would be if used alone.

Random cannabinoid info

* CBG is the mother compound, eventually becoming all the other cannabinoids.
- good for pain relief, best if paired with THC

CBN - sedative and pain relief

CBD is an antagonist of both CB1 and CB2 receptor sites, though not a primary antagonist
- it works more as an allosteric modulator of other eCB receptor sites
- when combined with THC both become potentiated

THCa - anti-inflammatory
- can be substituted for CBD with seizure patients if they don't respond to CBD treatment
- will work as anti-inflammatory in topicals
- imparts a sense of wellbeing instead of overwhelming euphoria

Misc. facts

Most high CBD chemovars started out as sativas.

Granddaddy Purple is an excellent indica for cancer patients

If you take too much THC you can take some CBD and it'll soften the effects of the THC.

When giving small amounts of cannabinoids you need to have them in a form that's easy to measure and dose accurately if you're expecting consistent results.
- If you have 700 mg/gram how do you know the difference between 2mg and 3mg?Scales aren't going to be that sensitive.
- Infused oils let you get consistent dosing over time
- A whole plant extraction with carrier oils will allow you to get to minute doses.


How it works: Cancer

CBD: Lowers response of ID-1 gene, restricting the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. High levels of ID-1are found in brain, liver, skin, and thyroid gland cancer cells. It is also expressed in fetal cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

Cannabidiol as a major component of the cancer treatment protocol
* Non-small cell lung cancer
* Gastric Cancer
* Breast cancer
* Prostate cancer
* Melanoma
* Glioblastoma
* Hepatocarcinoma
* Anaplastic thyroid tumor
* Metastasis of certain cancers

If you’re treating any of these cancers you can start out with higher CBD:THC ratios to hopefully stop metastasis and proliferation.

After reviewing patient history and questionnaire determine
* dose goal
* terpene and cannabinoid profiles and ratios

Cannabis dosing defies conventional approaches.
* Age is more a determination than weight
* youngest patients took highest doses for Glioblastoma
* oldest patients took the highest doses

Dose chart: Glioblastoma

88-yr old male(63kg) - 75:30 (ablue Dream: ACDC)

58-yr old male (84kg) - 350:100 (Candyland:ACDC)

54-yr old male (59kg) - 300:100 (Blue Dream: Valentine X)

23-yr old male (84kg) - 300:100 (XJ13:ACDC)

61-yr old female (55kg) - 1000:200 (Blue Dream: Valentine X)

50-yr old female (77kg) - 150:50 (XJ13:ACDC)

28-yr old female (63kg) - 200:100 (Berry OG:ACDC)

3-yr old female (18kg) 409:350 (Sour Diesel: ACDC)


Breast Cancer

45-yr old female (63kg) - 250:250 (Sour Diesel:ACDC)

47-yr old female (59kg) - 100:100 (Sour Diesel: ACDC)

43-yr old female (61kg) - 159:150 (Sour Diesel:Valentine X)

44-yr old female (71kg) - 150:75 (Pepe le Pu:ACDC)

57-yr old female (57kg)* - 30:100 (Pepe me Pu:ACDC)

35-yr old female (57kg)* - 30:15 (Sour Diesel:ACDC

* only wanted to treat side effects, not cure


Questions For The Patient

* What’s the diagnosis?

* What’s the current cannabis use and experience?

* What pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals are you on?

CBD will interfer with the CP450 pathway and will potentially cause certain medicines to build up to dangerous levels. Any medicine that cautions you against grapefruit juice is suspect and serum levels should be monitored more closely if using CBD.

*What’s your age?

* What’s your objective? What are you trying to accomplish?


How it works: Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a symptom of many, many diseases. To say you're treating epilepsy is a misnomer. You need to find the root cause of the seizures.

THC: Activation of CB1 receptor sites shorts out calcium ion pump on pre-synaptic neurons, potentially stopping grand mail seizures

Processes hydrocortisone-like anti-inflammatory mechanism

CBD: Proven to reduce seizures and has well-established neuroprotective effects that are at least partially mediated by seratonin receptors

THCa: Appears to work in a similar manner as CBD, but more mechanism of action studies are needed. Typical use is after patient acclimates to CBD and experiences increased seizure activityTHCa will often replace CBD when it stops working and vice versa

THCV: Similar to THC in mechanism of action. Euphoric benefit present without being uncomfortably overwhelming.

Ex: 7-yr old female (35kg) - 10.3:250 (ACDC)

To form an effective protocol to control epileptic seizure disorders lifestyle and dietary changes must become part of the program.

How it works: Intractable Nerve Pain

THC: There are 5 mechanism involved with pain reduction with eCB1 and eCB2 activation by THC:
  1. retards electrochemical reactions at peripheral pain receptors
  2. interrupts pain signal at Basal Root Ganglia
  3. interrupts pain signal at neuron
  4. activation of eCB2 at leukocytes provides major anti-inflammatory response
  5. psychoactive euphoric effects and short-term memory reduction mitigate stress response to pain

CBD: Anti-inflammatory mechanism provides 30-50 times hydrocortisone relief without shutting down the adrenal gland.

All disease involves inflammation.


Ex: 78-yr old female taking 15 mg THCa, 5 mg THC, and 15 mg CBD (OG2xSour:Swiss Gold)

A closer look at the dosing adjustments:
- patient has intractable nerve pain
- hadn't slept well in 20 years
- was suicidal

1. Swiss Gold (infused in EVOO)
0.07% THC
0.69% CBD

CBD target dose: 15mg, in 3 daily doses
2.174g extract/tincture/day
0.725g/dose
Total THC/day:1.5 mg

2a. OG2xSour
3.7% THCa
0.01% CBD

THCa target dose: 15mg in a single daily dose of 0.405g
CBD dose is negligible

2b. OG2xSour
3.7% THCa
0.93%THC

THCa target dose: 15mg in a single daily dose of 0.405g of tincture.

Amt. THC: 3.8mg

2c. OG2xSour
0.93% THC
0.01% CBD

THC target dose: 3.8mg in a single daily dose of 0.405g of tincture


How it works: Insomnia

THC: Many indica-dominant chemovars of cannabis contain terpenes such as b-myrcene and other cannabinoids like CBN that will cause somnolence at the correct dose. This is assisted to a great degree by the entourage effect of cannabis.
* Activation of CB1 receptor sites by THC at presynaptic neurons slows neural activity at the synaptic crest (Homeostasis).
* Activation of CB1 and CB2 receptor sites by THC causes relaxation by stimulating vasodilation of blood vessels (Homeostasis).
* Anti-anxiety action of THC at correct dose AIDS sleep

CBD: Mechanics of action not completely understood as sleep agent. Studies have been done for sleep and for wak-inducing properties.
- CBD is known to be an "alerting" cannabinoid and shouldn't be taken too close to bedtime.

Ex: 60-yr old man (82.5kg) - 25.0 (Granddaddy Purple)

You want a chemovar high in myrcene to help pass the BBB and one with higher CBN
- You can push CBN with time and sunlight.
- Take a bit of last year's harvest and store it poorly to generate more CBN for later when you want to make more oils for sleep.

How it works: Hypertension

THC:
* Activation of CB1 and CB2 receptor sites by THC
- causes vasodilation of blood vessels, lowering BP
- causes relief of stress by blocking production of acetylcholine within the brain
- slows down neurotransmission at the synaptic cleft

Ex: 57-yr old male - 30mg THC/day plus 13mg CBD/day (EVOO infusion)
- was looking at forced disability due to health issues
- on numerous meds that were ineffective

*** One of the reasons THC works so well for PTSD is the blockage of acetylcholine, which helps tremendously with short-term memory.

You can take acetylcholine supplements, but this is not advised for cancer patients due to the vasodilation.

Some patients with hypertension are similar to PTSD adrenaline push, stuck in fight or flight mode. You need THC to break the momentum.

This patient demonstrates how you work to replace one chemovar with another that closely matches the one you now can't get a supply of. In this case that happened twice.

1. Cotton Candy Deisel
0.6% THC
0.26% CBD

THC target daily dose: 30mg in a single daily dose of inhaled oil

Amt CBD: 13mg

After running out of Cotton Candy Diesel they replaced it with a compound formulation of Cookies and ACDC.

Cookies
0.64% THC
0.01% CBD

ACDC
0.02% THC
0.53% CBD

THC target dose: 30mg in a single dose of inhaled infused oil
* 4.482g Cookies + 2.109g ACDC

Amt CBD: 13mg


When they ran out of Cookies they switched to a combo of Swiss Gold and Pepe Le Pu.

Pepe Le Pu
0.91% THC
0.01% CBD

Swiss Gold
0.07% THC
0.69%CBD

THC target dose: 30mg in a single inhaled dose of infused EVOO
3.133 mg of Pepe Le Pu
2.129mg Swiss Gold

Amt CBD: 13mg

How it works: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) - Chron's Disease

THC: Activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors in gut by THC relieves motility and inhibits secretions that cause inflammation.

CBD: Reduction of inflammation leads to relief of many IBS symptoms
- Anti-bacterial properties relieve opportunistic abscesses often seen in Chron's

Ex: 54-yr old female - 30:15 (Pepe Le Pu:ACDC)

These patients respond to systemic administration(think capsules, edibles, suppositories), but can do well with inhallation as well.

Mara had another patient having problems with abscesses (fistula wouldn't heal) and she had him taking CBD by suppository while taking THC and CBD sublingually and vaping the same extract for breakthrough.


How it works: PTSD, ADHA, Tourette's Syndrome

THC:
*Blocks production of acetylcholine, which acts as a short-term memory transmitter, providing effective relief of reaccuring traumatic memories

* Activates CB1 receptors in brain providing psychotropic relief with proper dose and strain

* Cannabis chemovars that contain cannabinoid and terpene profiles which make them very energetic (pure sativas) will have a calming effect for patients with ADHD, much like prescription stimulants without side effects

Ex: 50-yr old female - 15:5 (Pepe Le Pu:ACDC)

Someone with PTSD who uses a sativa high in A-pinene will get a calming effect where someone else may be totally stressed out by the same chemovar.

These patients are most likely to have opposite effects than others have p, due to acetylcholine blockage

Conclusions:

* Cannabis is greater than the sum of its parts (entourage effect)
- Without the entourage effect you're missing out on the best effects available from the plant.

*Endo and exo (phyto) cannabinoids play a significant role in treating all disease

* It's important to choose the right chemovar (cannabinoid ratios and terpene profiles)

* It's possible to dose correctly and consistently

* Individual treatment plans are necessary

* Seperating the THC and CBD doses by at least two hours influences your results
- you'll be able to reduce the doses and still have the effect you seek
- CBD is an antagonist to the eCBRs, which means it can interfer with THC signalling

* cannabis medicines need to be lab tested to guarantee patient outcomes
- If you don't know what's really in the medicine you can't reasonably predict outcomes.

* Without THC most disease states wouldn't be responsive to cannabis therapies.

Q & A responses:

CBD will create one of three responses from a patient
1. make you energetic
2. make you sleepy
3. feel nothing different

Mara speculates that those who prefer sativas high in limonene and A-pinene get sleepier with CBD chemovars than those who prefer indicas.

People who can't adjust to cannabis therapies lack the ability to let go of control. They are eithe incapable or unwilling to relax into it. They have fear and a need to control.

Allergic reactions are to the terpenes in the chemovar.
- wear a mask while trimming to lessen potential allergic reactions
- One of Mara's patients would check for allergic reaction by rubbing the plant material on her skin.
 
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Thread starter #333

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Ok..... I feel really good about finally getting that one transcribed. I've had those notes for over a year. Lol! Now anyone who needs the info can easily pick it up here.

There are a couple more that I'm going to at least listen to to see if there are any more gems to be found.


 
Thread starter #334

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
@Lady Dory, I saw your footprints, and wanted to leave this for you

:5::5::5::5::5:
 
Thread starter #335

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Thread starter #336

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
receptor heterodimer - the result of the binding of endocannabinoid receptors to other receptors.

Ok... think for a minute..... a receptor has a basic function. Now it morphs with other receptors and becomes something new.

Hahaha! OMG, we are so incredibly designed. Lol! Exponential possibilities. Is there nothing we can do if we have enough belief?

Something tells me the answer to that question is an unequivocal

“NO!”

Ahhh.... what a glorious time to be alive. *sigh*. Ok.... I have to wind down and get some sleep. I have BINGO! to call in the morning. Lol! Who’d of ever thought? Hehe!

I’ll be making a quick batch of pain cream before I go, more reason to get thee to bed woman.
 
Thread starter #338

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
receptor heterodimer - the result of the binding of endocannabinoid receptors to other receptors.

Ok... think for a minute..... a receptor has a basic function. Now it morphs with other receptors and becomes something new.

Hahaha! OMG, we are so incredibly designed. Lol! Exponential possibilities. Is there nothing we can do if we have enough belief?

Something tells me the answer to that question is an unequivocal

“NO!”

Ahhh.... what a glorious time to be alive. *sigh*. Ok.... I have to wind down and get some sleep. I have BINGO! to call in the morning. Lol! Who’d of ever thought? Hehe!

I’ll be making a quick batch of pain cream before I go, more reason to get thee to bed woman.
That should have read “Is there anything we can’t do if we have enough belief?” Lol! By the time I finished that my brain was tired. Lol!

The answer is still a resounding cheer of

“NO!”

WooHoo! Got almost 8 hours of sleep!

It’s gonna be a great day! :slide:
 
Thread starter #339

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016