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Tiny little things red colored

solareclipse

Well-Known Member
Hi i have one question.
I have 20 plants about. More than half are almost harvest time and the rest are different ages.
Today I saw on a plant too many small tiny red insects in size of back side of needle. So small and so may.
I don't know the name and how to fight them but my question is why only on this plant?
20 more around this.almost the leaves touch each other. They could go everywhere.
Why those insects choose only this lady?
She is 2 weeks before harvest ,outdoor grow on pots not in ground.
Why choose only this plant and not a second or third?
Does anyone knows?
Very weird and I m so curious to see if there is an explanation.
Thank you
 

Bounce3d

Well-Known Member
like this?

Capture.JPG
 

SmokingWings

Well-Known Member
Why those insects choose only this lady?
Spider mites, sometimes called Two Spotted Mites, will look a brownish red because of the two spots. If, and it is not a for sure thing, but if you have the Two Spotted Mites they probably selected that one plant because it was the weakest. Nature is that way, start with the weak. Because they seem to look like a Ladybug then you might have the Two Spotted and you are seeing the spots.

However, there are two types of Red Mites. One is not good and one is very good to have around. Both of them are all red, like tiny, tiny drops of red ink. The not good one will chew on the leaves of the plant. The good Red Mite is a predator mite and spends its life eating other mites, including the Two Spotted. I have not researched how to tell them apart quickly.

I have had Red Mites on my outdoor patio plants. They seem to hang around for a few days, and then they are gone. I have the feeling that they are the good kind and have left because they ran out of other mites to eat.

Check each and every one of the other plants even if you do not see any mites or insects. Look all over the bud area. Use a higher powered magnifying glass or a loupe. You should be able to find some sort of app for a cell phone to do this if you want another app on your phone. Or buy the magnifying glass. Loupes are harder to find but should still be available at camera stores. My loupe is an 8X power and I can see mites if they are there.

Even without the equipment give the plants a look over. Check for any insect. Look at the points on the serrations on the fingers of the leaves up near the bud. What you want to look for will be tiny webs, kinda like a thin hair, going from one point to the next. The picture that @Bounce3d found shows a real spider mite web, real thick looking with a lot of strands of webbing.
 

solareclipse

Well-Known Member
Spider mites, sometimes called Two Spotted Mites, will look a brownish red because of the two spots. If, and it is not a for sure thing, but if you have the Two Spotted Mites they probably selected that one plant because it was the weakest. Nature is that way, start with the weak. Because they seem to look like a Ladybug then you might have the Two Spotted and you are seeing the spots.

However, there are two types of Red Mites. One is not good and one is very good to have around. Both of them are all red, like tiny, tiny drops of red ink. The not good one will chew on the leaves of the plant. The good Red Mite is a predator mite and spends its life eating other mites, including the Two Spotted. I have not researched how to tell them apart quickly.

I have had Red Mites on my outdoor patio plants. They seem to hang around for a few days, and then they are gone. I have the feeling that they are the good kind and have left because they ran out of other mites to eat.

Check each and every one of the other plants even if you do not see any mites or insects. Look all over the bud area. Use a higher powered magnifying glass or a loupe. You should be able to find some sort of app for a cell phone to do this if you want another app on your phone. Or buy the magnifying glass. Loupes are harder to find but should still be available at camera stores. My loupe is an 8X power and I can see mites if they are there.

Even without the equipment give the plants a look over. Check for any insect. Look at the points on the serrations on the fingers of the leaves up near the bud. What you want to look for will be tiny webs, kinda like a thin hair, going from one point to the next. The picture that @Bounce3d found shows a real spider mite web, real thick looking with a lot of strands of webbing.
I will get some pictures this morning.
Mites I deal in past with them and I know how look like.
Those one was visible with naked eye.
Please give a few hours coz it is 4:30 in the morning here ,I will go when sunrise to get some pictures
Thank you
 

solareclipse

Well-Known Member
Spider mites, sometimes called Two Spotted Mites, will look a brownish red because of the two spots. If, and it is not a for sure thing, but if you have the Two Spotted Mites they probably selected that one plant because it was the weakest. Nature is that way, start with the weak. Because they seem to look like a Ladybug then you might have the Two Spotted and you are seeing the spots.

However, there are two types of Red Mites. One is not good and one is very good to have around. Both of them are all red, like tiny, tiny drops of red ink. The not good one will chew on the leaves of the plant. The good Red Mite is a predator mite and spends its life eating other mites, including the Two Spotted. I have not researched how to tell them apart quickly.

I have had Red Mites on my outdoor patio plants. They seem to hang around for a few days, and then they are gone. I have the feeling that they are the good kind and have left because they ran out of other mites to eat.

Check each and every one of the other plants even if you do not see any mites or insects. Look all over the bud area. Use a higher powered magnifying glass or a loupe. You should be able to find some sort of app for a cell phone to do this if you want another app on your phone. Or buy the magnifying glass. Loupes are harder to find but should still be available at camera stores. My loupe is an 8X power and I can see mites if they are there.

Even without the equipment give the plants a look over. Check for any insect. Look at the points on the serrations on the fingers of the leaves up near the bud. What you want to look for will be tiny webs, kinda like a thin hair, going from one point to the next. The picture that @Bounce3d found shows a real spider mite web, real thick looking with a lot of strands of webbing.
Well I think it was the good ones but I killed them just before read this ...
I see no eaten leaves and only one plant was on .
I deal in past with spidermites and I am 100% not spidermites.
Those ones are visible with eye and there r were a colony on the plant.
More than 50 all together.
This plant I think maybe have spidermites .
Anyway
Thank you very much for this tips
 
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