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Using beneficial bacteria and fungi such as great white

YellowBelly

Active Member
Simple answer: yes. The Mycorrhizae are filamentous and act as a secondary root system, providing nutrients to the plant in exchange for sugars that it needs. I would imagine some of these other species will make a home elsewhere in the tank. I'm actually going to add plastic biomedia in my DWC to facilitate them.
 

kentboy1296

Active Member
Simple answer: yes. The Mycorrhizae are filamentous and act as a secondary root system, providing nutrients to the plant in exchange for sugars that it needs. I would imagine some of these other species will make a home elsewhere in the tank. I'm actually going to add plastic biomedia in my DWC to facilitate them.
Ok, im trying a Heisenberg tea formula (tweeked to my standards) EWC hydrogaurd and great white. Using it to get rid of any nasty shit i got and then as a preventative for bad shit. U brew a tea?
 

YellowBelly

Active Member
Ok, im trying a Heisenberg tea formula (tweeked to my standards) EWC hydrogaurd and great white. Using it to get rid of any nasty shit i got and then as a preventative for bad shit. U brew a tea?
I got mine from The Nutrient Company. You can Google them if you are UK-based. Comes in soluble powder forms. To keep Pythium away, I think going much over 21C hits the oxygen carrying capacity of water, which is ideal for pythium to flourish. It's important, it seems, to have lots of bubbles going in the tank water. The other thing that might be worth doing, if you have the room in the tank, is put a small submersible fish tank pump with a short length of pipe on to stir the water around to help avoid anaerobic (oxygen-depleted) areas in the tank where pythium can fester. Algae and anaerobic bacteria love warm, still water. ... think of a stagnant pond with the DWC potentially having all the ingredients of one.

The bacterial additives will help but make sure they have enough oxygen as well as the plants. Pythium problems can likely be solved with bacteria, moving the water with an underwater pump and upgrading the air pump for better oxygen-dissolving - if the conditions are very warm.

Bear in mind, I'm NOT talking from experience but I have put quite a few hours into reading and understanding the micro-organism side of hydro... because it interests me. :)
 
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kentboy1296

Active Member
I just got me a great new pump and have 3 other decent ones, i can use all if need be, but the new 1 has a 6 manifold and is one of those metal strong square pump, got 2 air stone in each bucket including the epicenter, the is no still standing water in the system, so hopefully everything will be ok... Thanks for your input, here is some pics of my system
1760833
1760835
 

YellowBelly

Active Member
I just got me a great new pump and have 3 other decent ones, i can use all if need be, but the new 1 has a 6 manifold and is one of those metal strong square pump, got 2 air stone in each bucket including the epicenter, the is no still standing water in the system, so hopefully everything will be ok... Thanks for your input, here is some pics of my system View attachment 1760833View attachment 1760835
Yeah, you've got a circulating system. Could light be passing through the clay pebbles?
 
Sounds about rite to me, I’m just learning up on the whole benificial bacteria as started a drain to waist in rock wool slab system. 45 gallon drum as my resivoir with air stone bubbling away. Water temp is about 16C so not real warm but would like to be ahead of the train rather than behind it and if growing bacteria is the answer I’m in.
 
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