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Watering daily

OGeMann

Well-Known Member
Strain - White Widow auto
# of Plants -4
Grow Type - Soil
Grow Stage - Flower
Bucket Size - 3 Gallon
Lights - (2) 1000 Watt LED (quantum Board
Nutrients - Meigs Fertilizer Company
Medium - 80% FFOF 20% coco
PPM - 900
PH - 6.3
RH - 40% to 50%
Room Temperature -75 to 80
Solution Temperature -72 to 74
Room Square Footage - 5' x 5' x 8'
Pests - None

Is it ok to water just PH at 6.3 daily, Oh about 32+ OZ ???
Thoughts.......
 
Last edited:

Nunyabiz

Well-Known Member
Totally dependent on numerous factors that only you can know.
I water my plants daily with about a gallon to gallon and a half everyday and I water about 5x a day just a few cups at a time.
But I am in a 25 gallon fabric pot in living organic soil that has more aeration and a cover crop plus worms so my soil tilth drains very well and the cover crop drinks water and worms keep the soil porous.

FFOF which I use for my veggies outside seems to hold onto water quite a bit.

If you're in flower, plants are vigorous and those 3 gallon pots are fabric then you could easily go through that much water a day.
You could also just as easily drown them.
You're going to have judge for yourself what your conditions are.
Most here are going to tell you to let your pot dry out almost completely, depending on your soil tilth that may be needed.
 

OGeMann

Well-Known Member
when you said plants are vigorous in 3 gal fabric pots..VERY TRUE, next grow I am using 5 gallon pots.
worms in gardens, ...that just brings back memories when my dad had worms in his garden, he used to take my moms coffee grounds and had a mound of coffee to collect worms. fun times.... never went with out worms
 
If a hydro farmer can keep his or her roots wet so can a soil grower in fact the same reason that a hydro farmer would not let there containers go dry are the same reasons why soil should never be fully dried out. Dry soil equals dead dry roots.
 

OGeMann

Well-Known Member
Totally dependent on numerous factors that only you can know.
I water my plants daily with about a gallon to gallon and a half everyday and I water about 5x a day just a few cups at a time.
But I am in a 25 gallon fabric pot in living organic soil that has more aeration and a cover crop plus worms so my soil tilth drains very well and the cover crop drinks water and worms keep the soil porous.

FFOF which I use for my veggies outside seems to hold onto water quite a bit.

If you're in flower, plants are vigorous and those 3 gallon pots are fabric then you could easily go through that much water a day.
You could also just as easily drown them.
You're going to have judge for yourself what your conditions are.
Most here are going to tell you to let your pot dry out almost completely, depending on your soil tilth that may be needed.
when you said plants are vigorous in 3 gal fabric pots..VERY TRUE, next grow I am using 5 gallon pots.
worms in gardens, ...that just brings back memories when my dad had worms in his garden, he used to take my moms coffee grounds and had a mound of coffee to collect worms. fun times.... never went with out worms
 

OGeMann

Well-Known Member
If you go to the fox farm site and look at the directions on using there soil they never mention to let your soil dry out but they do say to water thoroughly.
have you used FFOF, when it drys.....its like mud when it dries i have to break it up before watering. I think its the 3 gal fabric pots i am using,getting 5 gal fabric pots next grow
 

OGeMann

Well-Known Member
If a hydro farmer can keep his or her roots wet so can a soil grower in fact the same reason that a hydro farmer would not let there containers go dry are the same reasons why soil should never be fully dried out. Dry soil equals dead dry roots.
100% Totally agree
 

OGeMann

Well-Known Member
I have been using only Fox farm soils 15 years plus. I have mastered them take a gander at all my media every plant is in fox farm and 100% healthy start to finish.
I love Fox Farm, tried out FFOF because they didn't have bush doctor
 
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