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Watering seedlings

vintner

New Member
I grow in soil. Since my seedlings don''t need nutes for the first month or so, what's a good Ph to use when I water them?
 

MadameCrash

Active Member
Hi Vinter! PH 6.3 is what you want to aim for throughout their entire life. I usually keep it between PH 6.0 - 6.4 if at all possible, but it's better for it to be a teesy bit too low than too high.

Peace
MC
 

vintner

New Member
Hey, thanks MC. So, how do I adjust the Ph of my water? I remember reading something about using bakig soda or vinegar. Is there a good link for that?
 

MadameCrash

Active Member
Hey Vinter... I'm too lazy to search for a link... lol... so I'll lay it out for ya..

Vinegar is to lower the PH
Baking Soda will raise the PH

If you're using city tap water... boil it first or let it sit out overnight to get rid of the chlorine. Boiling I've found also helps keep the PH more stable - no idea why... lol.... :hmmmm:

Apple Cider vinegar is very effective at lowering the PH quickly and is good for your plants - so is Balsamic Vinegar although it is not quite as acidic so requires a drop or two more.

Baking Soda is very effective and only needs a tiny pinch to raise the PH..

Hope this helps!

Peace
MC
 

Racefan

Well-Known Member
madamecrash said:
Hey Vinter... I'm too lazy to search for a link... lol... so I'll lay it out for ya..

Vinegar is to lower the PH
Baking Soda will raise the PH

If you're using city tap water... boil it first or let it sit out overnight to get rid of the chlorine. Boiling I've found also helps keep the PH more stable - no idea why... lol.... :hmmmm:

Apple Cider vinegar is very effective at lowering the PH quickly and is good for your plants - so is Balsamic Vinegar although it is not quite as acidic so requires a drop or two more.

Baking Soda is very effective and only needs a tiny pinch to raise the PH..

Hope this helps!

Peace
MC


You know guys and gals, while all these home made PH adjusters work, they are not the best things to use. That's why they make PH up and PH down. The real up and down has buffers to keep PH more stable for a longer period. While I agree on a emergency use of these items, I wouldn't suggest using them for a entire grow. Yes growers do and have had results doing it, but that doesn't make it the best choice. PH up and PH down are super cheap. $10.00 should get you a bottle of each or close to it anyway. I've had the same bottle of PH down for 3 years now. Never had to buy PH up. Most growers don't ever use the up anyway. Just my opinion.


race
 
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Racefan

Well-Known Member
I don't know the answer to that question. I've never been to a nursery for anything other than plants for landscaping before. You can use the organic stuff they mention above. Like I said, others have done it with success. You might have to check and adjust your PH more often due to the lack of buffers. I won't use it and I explained why above. I don't want to stop someone from using what they want to use just because I don't agree with it. Like I ended above...Just my opinion...and we all know what opinions are like right.:3:
 
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MadameCrash

Active Member
Vinegar is all I use to adjust the PH Down, and my plants don't seem to mind. I also adjust the PH down to 5.9 - 6.4 in soil (and soil-less) that gives it a little bit of "swing time" so the PH does not climb too high in between waterings.

The soil will act as a long-term PH buffer.. so vinegar/baking soda works just fine in that case.. Plus, vinegar does not change the PPM's of the water. PH Down is Phosphoric Acid.. it increases the 'P' levels - like a mild fertilizer.

For hydro, I would definately recommend the "professional" PH UP and PH Down for the same reasons that Racefan said.

Peace
MC
 

Racefan

Well-Known Member
madamecrash said:
Vinegar is all I use to adjust the PH Down, and my plants don't seem to mind. I also adjust the PH down to 5.9 - 6.4 in soil (and soil-less) that gives it a little bit of "swing time" so the PH does not climb too high in between waterings.

The soil will act as a long-term PH buffer.. so vinegar/baking soda works just fine in that case.. Plus, vinegar does not change the PPM's of the water. PH Down is Phosphoric Acid.. it increases the 'P' levels - like a mild fertilizer.

For hydro, I would definately recommend the "professional" PH UP and PH Down for the same reasons that Racefan said.

Peace
MC
Well you see...That's why I think the way I do.:3: I've gotten lazy and haven't checked my PH since I went back to soil. lol I checked it daily in hydro though. :3:
 

Gorillabuds

New Member
I actually keep soil PH levels 6.5 to 6.9 or so. That's why I included a picture of where the soil PH range is in my grow gallery. Every grow thread I've read says something similar to this:

Cannabis grows best in soil with a pH from 6.5 to 7. Within this range, marijuana can properly absorb and process available nutrients most efficiently. If the pH is too low (acidic), acid salts bind nutrients chemically, and the roots are unable to absorb them. An alkaline soil with a high pH causes nutrients to become unavailable. Toxic salt build up that limits water intake by roots also becomes a problem. Hydroponic solutions perform best in a pH range a little lower than for soil.
The pH level is much more important in organic soil gardens than in chemical hydroponic gardens. The pH dictates the environment of bacteria necessary to the uptake of organic nutrients.
 

Gorillabuds

New Member
madamecrash said:
If you're using city tap water... boil it first or let it sit out overnight to get rid of the chlorine. Boiling I've found also helps keep the PH more stable - no idea why... lol.... :hmmmm: MC

The reason why is because boiling the water causes the dissolved solids to precipitate out onto the surfaces of the vessel that the water is being boiled in. Removing the solids and boiling off any other dissolved gasses will drive the PH closer to neutral. Boil water in a pot, dump it down the drain and then let the pot cool. Wipe your finger on the sides and bottom of the pot. That white powder now on your finger is calcium and magnesium, mostly. Take it from the guy with the license to operate steam boilers.
 
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