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What about Poison Ivy Exposure?

Smokin Moose

Fallen Cannabis Warrior
General Information
Many outdoor growers go through the dreadful experience of coming in contact with Poison Ivy. Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) is a common plant that grows throughout much of the US. The toxic chemical produced by the plant is called urushiol. It is produced in resin ducts of the leaves, flowers, fruits, and bark of stems and roots. However, urushiol is not present in the pollen grains. Urushiol is highly stable and can be spread by without direct contact, such as by petting your dog which has came in contact with this plant. It can remain on clothing and still cause a rash a year after exposure. Luckily, the resin can be removed with simple soap and water.


Identification
It can appear as a ground cover, a shrub, or as a vine growing up a tree. The leaves are always grouped in threes, is hairy and smooth and are often irregular in shape. The leaves can be slightly lobed, and are a dark waxy green, above, and light, fuzzier beneath.

Blistering
Poison Ivy is usually not severe but some cases result in a trip to the Emergency Room. Most people who react to poison ivy do so within one to two days. Contact with this plant leads to skin inflammation, or dermatitis. However, some people will react more quickly, which can be a medical emergency, especially if the face and eyes are affected. One can react to poison ivy at any age.

Treatment
A visit to the doctors is always recommended but if you feel your case is not severe, there are over the counter products that will treat Poison Ivy, Oral antihistamines can help the itching, but the antihistamine lotions wont. Aluminum acetate (Burow's solution) is recommended for topical use to sooth the itching. An Aveeno oatmeal bath is also shown to help stop itching.

* Do not use anesthetic sprays as they may actually make your rash more annoying.
* "Zanfel" poison ivy cream is said to work very well for 40 dollars a tube.
* calamine lotions are ineffective for treatment.
 

hawtway

New Member
Stinging Nettle patches make great outdoor stealth-grow locations. The cannabis plant looks like a cousin so the two together is not obvious. No problem with spoilers and banditos casually sauntering through the nettles.
Happy Growing,
:volcano-smiley:
 

Jackopotomus

Active Member
So if Urushiol acid can stay on a dog and ten be transmitted to you could the same be said of MJ? I know Urushiol is very potent like in its pure form the amount thay covers a pin head can effect the whole world. I also know that if you burn it the urushiol can be transmitted through smoke and get in your lungs ultra dangerous. So if my outdoor MJ comes into contact with poison ivy could the Urushiol be passed that way?
 

Canresearcher

Active Member
Just a bit of interesting info,
Actually all members of Toxicodendron family contain Urushiol, and this includes the infamous lacquer tree (Toxicodendron vernicifluum)
which is used to create Chinese, Korean and Japanese lacquerware. Urushi is the name given to lacquer in Japanese. It was also used medicinally and in Japan,Korea and China... In Korea the dried stems of the plant are used to create a soup called OkTtak (옻닭) which as you can imagine can put you in the hospital if you aren't careful or even kill you.

Just thought I'd pass this info along...

A good defensive (deterrent) plant is Pyracantha as it produces long Razor sharp hollow barbs which can puncture just about anything. Nasty stuff .
 

Deedoubleusee

New Member
If and when you come in contact with it try and rinse the exposed area immediately with water. It keeps the oil for bonding with your skin. I walked through 100 yards of it in shorts. Luckly I was next a river. Rinsed it off and not a thing...
 

Canresearcher

Active Member
So if Urushiol acid can stay on a dog and ten be transmitted to you could the same be said of MJ? I know Urushiol is very potent like in its pure form the amount thay covers a pin head can effect the whole world. I also know that if you burn it the urushiol can be transmitted through smoke and get in your lungs ultra dangerous. So if my outdoor MJ comes into contact with poison ivy could the Urushiol be passed that way?
Urushiol isn't an acid. It is a combination of several different pyrocatechols or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (and closely related non-volatile molecules). As I stated earlier, Urushiol is sometime found in some plants used in cooking. It is potentially deadly if it isn't prepared properly. I think you might be thinking of Ricinus Communis. (Castor bean)
Which contains the deadly lectin (protein), Ricin.
 

iHemp

New Member
I have poison ivy growing all over the place, including up the side of the buildings. It usually deters unwanted guests, which reduces theft. I cut some of it back now and then when it is hanging where I have to duck under it to go in a run in shed etc., but I like to leave it in the front of the house and in the front yard to keep people away. It doesn't bother me unless I actually touch it, and then only if I scratch at it. If I accidentally get it on me, I can usually wash it off before it starts itching or gets under my skin. Not a big deal for me, but other people leave as soon as they see it.
:ciao:
Everything has a purpose, and poison ivy can be a hermit's best friend.
 
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