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What Does Islam Say About Weed?

Jim Finnel

Fallen Cannabis Warrior & Ex News Moderator
The title of the evening event at a mosque in Corona, Calif., was intended to provoke discussion, even as it raised an eyebrow or two: "The Islamization of Weed?"

The unusual lecture at the Islamic Society of Corona-Norco in February drew about 150 people, most younger than 30. The idea, said Imam Mustafa Umar, was to encourage a dialogue and attract people who might be put off by a more traditionally religious theme.

Not that the speaker, Sheikh Yassir Fazaga from Mission Viejo, Calif., was there to advocate marijuana use or say it was permissible in Islam. The goal of the lecture, and a small but growing number of similar events addressing issues of depression, promiscuity, alcohol use or homosexuality, is not to change the religion's views on them, but to recognize they are issues that affect the Muslim community, along with others.

Pretending that Muslims don't smoke marijuana is naive, Fazaga said, and counterproductive.

As Muslims in this country grapple with the fact that social issues they thought didn't exist within their communities are there and growing, some leaders of the faith are saying these relevant topics should be addressed at the mosque. No longer, they say, can sermons focus only on such topics as the importance of praying five times a day or fasting in the holy month of Ramadan, without seeming out of touch.

"Generally speaking, religious communities think that by being religious it makes them inherently immune to these problems," said Fazaga, of the nonprofit Orange County Islamic Foundation. "It's wishful thinking."

In February, he gave a sermon about pornography and was approached afterwards by several people, including a 12-year-old boy, who acknowledged having a porn problem. "When I give a sermon about depression, I know the minute I step down from the pulpit, I will have a line of people, 'Sheikh, my mother is depressed,' 'Sheikh, my niece tried to commit suicide.'"

Asim Khan, a junior at Cal Poly Pomona who attended the marijuana discussion, praised the mosque leaders for holding it. "I think it's great ... if you're ignoring something for the longest time it's just going to build up and build up," Khan said. "The youth know that (marijuana) is an issue. They're not stupid, they go to high school and they go to college."

But he said other mosques he knows of, especially those run by older clergy or with less youth involvement, aren't willing to talk about societal issues in such an open way.

For many in the older generation, the forbidden status of drugs, premarital sex and homosexuality in Islam are clear and thus don't need to be discussed, said Aslam Abdullah, director of the Islamic Society of Nevada. But now that more Muslims are dealing with these issues directly and not just on a theological and abstract level, some see it is an opportunity to expand their understanding of their faith, said Abdullah. He is scheduled to give a lecture "Islamic Perspective of Homosexuality" at a mosque in Chino Valley, Calif., later this month.

"People are now willing to go back to the original source and to understand what was said originally and what was meant originally," Abdullah said. "They are saying, yes this topic is settled but we want to understand why."

For many, though, talking about these issues isn't just about connecting with young people or learning more about the faith. It's also about changing the image some may have of the mosque and its role in the American-Muslim community.

Khan, the college student, said the marijuana event gave some people he knows a new impression of the mosque.

"It showed that things that are taboo or were considered taboo ... are starting to be addressed at the mosque," he said. "It did provide a change of perspective that, yeah, 'Someone is at the mosque that I could talk to about my problems and not everyone here at the mosque is pretending to be the perfect Muslim'."

But most mosques are still playing catch up and many are not yet ready, because they lack the resources or the willingness, to have such open conversations, Abdullah said. Large events that are well publicized, such as the one he will give on homosexuality, can help to encourage others.

"I believe that the houses of God are where people come to seek guidance," he said. "I think they are the best places to seek the guidance and seek clarity on these issues."


NewsHawk: Jim Behr: 420 MAGAZINE
Source: thonline.com
Author: RAJA ABDULRAHIM
Copyright: 2011 Woodward Communications, Inc.
Contact: TH - Contact Us
Website: TH - Feature Stories Article
 

Jim Finnel

Fallen Cannabis Warrior & Ex News Moderator
I saw that. But it wasn't necessarily connected to bin laden. There were garden plots inside the compound. Local farmers were growing around the outside. Lets not portray that s.o.b. as a Cannabis user.
 

G-Dog

New Member
It's Pakistan... lots of weed growing there. I picture Bin Laden more of a crack head or better yet crack pot. He was exiled out of Saudi (Mecca) so he could hardly be considered a driving force in his religion.

As far as the main topic is concerned, most religions understand the frailty of human will and the goal is to just try to behave. Most people fail miserably at religion period. You have preachers that scream about homosexuality and then it turns out they have a boy friend or prostitute. Many westerners think that the strict code of Islam is enough to curb human will. Highjackers involved in 9/11 called on prostitutes their last night on earth, CIA records show. If my religious studies in my youth taught me anything it is; Nobody is perfect.
 

demp5294

New Member
Man's mind created god.Nature created Cannabis. :peace:
 

Bonehead

New Member
CNN made it sound like you could grow cabbage and potatoes next to cannabis and it will just blend in.

Someone will some how use this against cannabis. I see it coming.
 

greengo840

New Member
Muslims can enjoy their cannabis just like me.:yummy:

Weed grows like weeds in these parts, and despite our ridiculous media bias against people living in Islamic countries, many love smoking there. Even the nasty goat fucking Wahhabis like Bin Laden turn a semi-blind eye to smoking although they officially condemn the act.

In fact, the Wahhabis just honored Bin Laden w/ the first permissible mind altering refreshment--two shots and a splash of water.
 

Zardoz

New Member
This article only mentions that they were discussing cannabis, but it never does say what they have to say about it. Also, muslims do have a legal intoxicant. It's called Ghat or Qat, which is a natural herb with amphetamine like effects. It's sold openly at markets.
 

weedquotes

New Member
I don't know what Islam says about smoking weed, but I know for sure what Gil Kopatch says about this subject; check it out, it's pretty interesting stuff: "You know, there are around a million Israelis who smoke this stuff. You know how much this costs me? Loads. And do you know who grows and produces this? Hamas and Hezbollah. Yes, David. As defense minister, it is important that you know this. They're making piles of money off of us. They take the money and buy kassams to fire at us. A pity, no? Why shouldn't it be legal? You see, if it'll be legal, we could grow it here on these arid Negev hills, make the wilderness flower. We will keep the money in Israel and use it for good causes, David, like raising the teachers' salaries... The question is, though, what will Hamas and Hezbollah do with all the hashish they'll be left with? The answer is simple: They'll smoke it. They'll smoke it, David, and be calm. Because a good Arab is a calm Arab. And this, is my security concept"
 

ChicagoJoe

420 Member
I recently asked a cabbie during a ride about his religion and cannabis use.

He is Muslim and talked with me openly. Said no intoxicants for pleasure. And that is strict policy. He also went on to talk about adultery which seemed to be more of an issue with him.
 

blackthunder

New Member
hi,
I come from a middle eastern background; my father was Christian but my last name is Jewish. My father was born in Lebanon and the use of hashish is part of that culture, particularly since alcohol use was banned by Mohammed. It has been in use in these cultures for centuries if not accept socially.
As with all cultures these seems to be a public persona and a private one.
I was born in Australia, and our society too is full of hypocrisy, but the truth of the matter is that Cannabis has been a part of these Islamic countries for centuries.
My father thought nothing of smoking hash, and this seems to be the way in many Islamic cultures. And as has been stated by ChicagoJoe adultery was more of an issue with the person he spoke too. This does not surprise me;
I guess no culture is free of hypocrisy;
Jim I have often admired your work, and your writing is immediate and very clear.
thank you for keeping us all informed.
 

Jim Finnel

Fallen Cannabis Warrior & Ex News Moderator
Jim I have often admired your work, and your writing is immediate and very clear.
thank you for keeping us all informed.
People often and mistakenly think that I'm the author of these articles. I don't wish to take the credit for someone else's work. The author of this article was Raja Abdulrahim. The information about article sources can be found at the bottom of each article we post.

I'll take a bit of the credit for helping to keep you all informed, your welcome :cool:
 

ChicagoJoe

420 Member
hi,
I come from a middle eastern background; my father was Christian but my last name is Jewish. My father was born in Lebanon and the use of hashish is part of that culture, particularly since alcohol use was banned by Mohammed. It has been in use in these cultures for centuries if not accept socially.
As with all cultures these seems to be a public persona and a private one.
I was born in Australia, and our society too is full of hypocrisy, but the truth of the matter is that Cannabis has been a part of these Islamic countries for centuries.
My father thought nothing of smoking hash, and this seems to be the way in many Islamic cultures. And as has been stated by ChicagoJoe adultery was more of an issue with the person he spoke too. This does not surprise me;
I guess no culture is free of hypocrisy;
Jim I have often admired your work, and your writing is immediate and very clear.
thank you for keeping us all informed.

I asked him about cannabis, to which he looked confused. SO I said marijuana. I should have said hashish since he would probably have been familiar.
 

demp5294

New Member
Religion is but a figment of the imagination,and they have set the battle lines Mideast/islam us/christian on both side Norml people like us. Cannabis is a creation of the Earth as are we. :peace:
 

mj4isloo

New Member
I live in Islamabad Pakistan and Being Muslim I disagree with killing any humans.... Osama was someone elses creation as far as we know and not a role model . wild sativa grows EVERYWHERE in Pakistan the Saudi inspired mullah dont smoke it the Sufi order love it and the pathans in the inaccessible tirah valley of FATA make unparallelled Gardaa( Hashish)
Not all the hashish available in the country is good though .....
 
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Zardoz

New Member
Now THERE is some information that we will never hear on the news! We need to do that in the US - plant it everywhere so they can never get it all.
 

THsea

New Member
I recently asked a cabbie during a ride about his religion and cannabis use.

He is Muslim and talked with me openly. Said no intoxicants for pleasure. And that is strict policy. He also went on to talk about adultery which seemed to be more of an issue with him.
This is what I have heard from many muslims. The ones I have met are perfectly fine with its use as medicine.
 
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