What Range Should I Maintain for my Growroom Humidity and Temperature?

Renegade69

Well-Known Member
Blazin,

I am certainly going to get me a humidifier tomorrow. Hell might get one tonight. But in the mean time, I like the moist paper towel suggestion. Will do that now. I also have a "The Green Pad, CO2 Generator" hanging in there. I mist/water it daily just before I close up for the night.

As always, 420 and all the SME's have come thru.

Thanks,
 
Blazin,

I am certainly going to get me a humidifier tomorrow. Hell might get one tonight. But in the mean time, I like the moist paper towel suggestion. Will do that now. I also have a "The Green Pad, CO2 Generator" hanging in there. I mist/water it daily just before I close up for the night.

As always, 420 and all the SME's have come thru.

Thanks,
Make sure you get one that actually sprays mist!!!!! the none mist ones dont work very well.
 

Renegade69

Well-Known Member
Small update on the paper towel. Raised the humidity up to 33%. I will still be getting a humidifier tomorrow but it did work in a pinch.

Thanks Blazin....
 

Renegade69

Well-Known Member
Not to hi-jack this thread see my updated thread regarding humidity changes and results.

Thanks to SmokeyMacPot for posing the question.

And special thanks to Blazin for his input.

Renegage69
 
The humidity in my room is 16%. Is that too low? I cannot afford a humidifier. Running fluorescent lights temperature in the room is 85 degrees to 80 degrees. I set up a cookie sheet with the wet rag above a small 400 watt heater in attempts to maybe create steam to add you made it to the room will that work?
 
The humidity in my room is 16%. Is that too low? I cannot afford a humidifier. Running fluorescent lights temperature in the room is 85 degrees to 80 degrees. I set up a cookie sheet with the wet rag above a small 400 watt heater in attempts to maybe create steam to add you made it to the room will that work?
Your temps are already got enough, just blow a fan across it
 
The humidity in my room is 16%. Is that too low? I cannot afford a humidifier. Running fluorescent lights temperature in the room is 85 degrees to 80 degrees. I set up a cookie sheet with the wet rag above a small 400 watt heater in attempts to maybe create steam to add you made it to the room will that work?
That's what I'm doing. That n I set up a 5 gal bucket with a fish tank pump bubbling on the surface. Raised my humidity 20-25%.
 
The safest way to switch from day to night lighting is when the light turns off let the plants sleep at least 24 hours before the next cycle starts; ergo, if yer shut off at 6PM now don't turn them on till 6PM the next day. This reduces chance of hermys!>)
please forgive me, I'm green as a nug. could you please explain that a little furtherfor me?? I'm not understanding when I give my ladies an extended nap. this is the first I've heard of that technique. :helpsmilie::peace2:
 
In veg you can grow fine with low humidity, so don't panic. Mine is current 22 percent. However it is NOT optimal and you guys or coming up with some really interesting ideas for fixing it.

I will probably add some hot, warm paper towels myself.
 
The temperature is the hardest factor to take control of to me. When confined to a small space, ballasts and lights can push temperatures sky-high in no time flat. That is why I use CFLS, to avoid venting heat. This is especially true during hot summer months when outside temperature reaches its highest. Nighttime (LIGHTS OFF period) temperature can be just as difficult to regulate during cold winter month. Most gardeners are aware that temperature in the grow room plays a major role and can greatly affect the growth of plants and the quality of the finished crop. Most gardeners do not know how controlling the temperature of their garden in very specific ways they can achieve a superior crop. Drift to far from these ideal temperatures and watch your plants and crop suffer.
Before getting started it is highly recommended that every indoor garden has a max/min thermometer. (Digital $5.95 at Walmart)

This product allows the gardener to see exactly the fluctuations in temperature within their garden. Without this useful tool there is no accurate way of knowing the different temperatures between daytime (lights on) and nighttime (lights off). The difference between the two temperatures is very important to plant growth. Anymore than a 10F-15F difference between daytime and nighttime temperatures and you risk shocking and stressing the plants. You want a 10 degree difference between LIGHTS ON and LIGHTS OFF temps. In general the optimal daytime temperature for plant growth is between 70F -75F. Drift to far above this range or too far below and growth can be severely affected. Daytime temperatures exceeding 90F or under 62F and plant growth will be slowed and stunted. Plants do thrive in afganastan's 110 degrees, but they almost quit growing at that temp. If the temperature drifts higher than 95F the plant's enzyme production will drop off and the plant will begin shutting down. At temperatures above 92 - 94, high photosynthesis shuts down due to the stomata in the leaves closing down to conserve water. At normal temperatures the stomata will be open, taking in CO2 and sweating water to keep the plant cool and allowing for transpiration.
Ideal temperature varies depending on whether or not CO2 is being introduced to the environment. A more suitable daytime temperature when the air is being enriched with CO2 is 80F-85F. This temperature range promotes the exchange of gases between the plants and the environment. Also, it can speed up the process of photosynthesis. Plant in an environment at 86F can perform carbon extraction from CO2 twice as fast as at 68F. It is still recommended that the nighttime temperature drop no more than 15f from that of the daytime temperature.

There is another relationship between temperature and the absorbsion of gases by plants that many hobbyist growers are aware of. That is the relationship between the temperature of the water in your reservoir and the amount of oxygen the water can hold. The best range that your reservoir can be between is 60F-75F. Ideally the reservoir temperature should be at 65F because this level contains the most oxygen. Also this temperature will help control transpiration (the act of drawing up nutrients by evaporating water through out the leaves), and humidity levels. Buying a simple aquarium floating thermometer will allow you to know where you fit in this range.


$2 to $4 at Walmart, Target,
PetSmart Aquarium Dept


Another great reason for regulating the temperature in your grow room is that biological processes can be speed up exponentially by every degree. This is true for your plants as well as the potential pests that may invade your grow room.
Pests such as spider mites can reproduce up to 10 times faster with every degree the temperature rises.
These pests can destroy a garden in no time flat, you really do not want to make it any easier for them. Spider Mite Eggs and webs can screw up the buds so bad, they can nto be smoked. With a daytime temperature at a steady 72F and nighttime temperature of 65F it is much easier to control and destroy spider mite, thrip, and many other pest populations.
The same principal can be applied to the prevention and control of fungi, molds, mildews, and bacteria, which can spread more rapidly when temperatures in the grow room or reservoir exceed 90F. Also, the warmer the air, the more water it can retain which means humidity levels can easily go beyond the recommended 40-50% for Vegging. (you want high humidity for VEG, and low humidity for Flowering.) This high humidity coupled with lower nighttime temperatures can cause condensation to form on leaves. This will invite molds, mildews, fungi, and bacteria to take over you grow space. With high temperatures the likely-hood of losing control of the problem, such as powdery mildew, is very high. Once control is lost your plants may be the next to go.

Temperature is also very important when it comes to starting seeds and getting cuttings to root. Placing seedling trays on a heating mat will reduce germination time dramatically. Speeding up germination time usually leads to stronger and healthier plants. Also, less time spent between crop cycles makes a garden efficient. More harvests provided in less time can equal big bucks in the pockets of professional growers.
The ideal temperature for sprouting or cloning is 80F. Any higher and you risk burning the roots. Also, many seeds simply will not germinate at temperatures over 90F. The seeds will become dormant and never sprout.
The same principal used for seeds is used on cuttings to coax roots out quicker. The sooner cuttings can establish roots the better. If roots can be forced quickly they will grow strong and stay strong. A bottom temperature of 80F-85F, roughly 10F warmer than the air, will speed up rooting time and help to jump start those roots once they do begin. Let the temperature get too high or too low and roots growth will be hindered or they will never grow at all. Using the proper technique and the proper temperature for bottom heat not only can rooting time be speed up from 2 weeks to as little as 3 days, but the survival rate of your cuttings will drastically improve.

On the topic of roots, there is an ideal temperature for the root zone after the plants' roots have been established. Roots are working 24 hours a day and constant attention is required concerning temperature in and around the root zone. The ideal temp for this root zone is generally 65 to 75 degrees F. At this temperature the ion exchange between the roots and the environment around them is at its absolute best. This means that the plant's root system can take up more macro nutrients, more micro nutrients, and more oxygen at this temperature than at any other level. This makes a plant more efficient and a plant working efficiently will provide a superior yield.

Amazingly, some growers grow successfully with no themometer for the air or water. But for maximum efficiency, you got to take control of temps.

HUMIDITY? that is more simple to me. Get the Humidity VERY high for VEGGING, and very low for FLOWERING.

in Vegging, I mist them daily. I do raise the lights up, to be careful with my bulbs getting wet and breaking. And when it rains outside, it also gets cloudy and the sun's rays are blocked. Plants in outdoors, in nature do get an ocasional rain shower or thunderstorm. Do you let it rain on yours? I do, but artificially by MISTING.
AND, I bought a cheap humidifier at Walmart for $26..

REMEBER, During Flowering, we need a low humidity, especially to avoid Bud mold and bud rot.
This is one of the best discussions and explanations on the temperature and humidity conditions I've seen yet. Thanks for all the great info! Cheers
 
I own 13 books on Hydroponic marijuana growing. I collect them. And I've been reading growing advice on the internet and in magazines for over 3 years. They all say something different on the best pH level, so I just sort of average them out.
One book says anything between 5.5 and 6.5 is fine. One book says anything between 5.6 and 7.0 is OK, and one book says strive for 5.9 or 6.0 but .5 higher or lower is OK too. Some books lean toward lower, like 5.5 to 6.0 and some say 6.0 to 6.5. I find a big diference in books and advice from the UK, or from Europe and those from here, for some reason unknown to me.

I adjust the pH daily in very slight increments. I add nutes twice daily, in slight increments.

I do not want the water level, or the nutrient level or the pH to go up and down or have spikes. I like it LEVEL, although I do know it needs to go up and down SOME, to get or absorb all the nutrients. When I do a very slight pH adjustment, if it is then within range, I do not adjust it again. Again, I do very slight adjustments, twice daily. I drain and replenish weekly. My plants love the air bath and free time out of the water, up to 15 minutes at most, often only five mintues. I get a growth spurt in VEG when I do a res change.

I work or check on my grow every morning at 7:00 am, before I go to work, and again at 6:30 pm, when I get home. I do a pH adjustment at both times, when I replenish the consumed water, but I only change it about .4 or .5, maybe .6 at the very most.
My main rules are No change more than .5 in 12 hours. No using both Up and Down. I use Bontanicare liquid Up and Down, or I have both, but I NEVER use the UP, never. I just did an entire grow without using the UP even once.

My well water comes out of the tap at 7.0 everytime, everyday, always, with seldom any changes.
My pH balanced Nutrients will change it to 6.6 to 6.7, maybe just 6.8
I know that one drop of DOWN will change one quart about .5
I know one level teaspoon will change one gallon of water from 7.0 to 6.0, or 1.0 decrease.
A half teaspoon of DOWN or 4 drops will change a half gallon about .4 or .5

I aim for 5.8 to 6.0 as my medium pH, and I desire anything between 5.6 and 6.5.
In the mornings, I find my water at 6.5 to 6.8 every morning. In the mornings, I need a half gallon to a full gallon of water added to the tank. I adjust my 7.0 half gallon of water to 6.0 OUT OF THE TANK by adding a slight amount of nutes and 4 drops of pH Down, and THEN add it to the tank, and the 6.7 tank will become 6.2. I get home from the office and the water is 6.6 or 6.7, I change it again, by adding a half to a full gallon of water, the needed amount of pH Down, and then check the ppm to see if I need more nutrients.

Daily, my pH runs anywhere from 5.8 to 6.8 and twice daily, I adjust it. While I adjust the pH and feed them, I talk to them, I love them, and I pray for them.

Works great for me.

I'd suggest you not ADJUST it weekly, but give them daily adjsutments, even if it is once a day.
thought this thread was for temperature and humidity not nutrients and ph its the same on every thread i read people always go off topic (most topics might i add) and start talking about nutrients is starting to make me want to leave the site as i dont use nutrients only (guano) so i dont want to hear about them in EVERY THREAD i read
 
Daytime conditions should be 70-80 degrees without co2, 80-90 degrees with co2 until the last two weeks when daytime temps should be kept between 70-80 and co2 can be reduced to adjust for the lower metabolism. Night temperatures should be kept above 60 degrees to prevent stress. It is preferrable during flowering to have a night temperature drop of 10-20 degrees to stimulate flowering hormones and reduce stem elongation.

I find that low humidity causes stress on plants. I recommend 50-60% humidity until the final 2 weeks of flowering. At this point, the humidity should be lowered as much as possible to encourage the plant to seal and protect itself with additional resin. (I am able to get the humidity to go as low as 31%) I have been able to frost things up considerably this way. The higher humidity levels prior to final ripening reduce salt levels within the plant tissue and encourage healthy, more lush growth.

Author: MisterIto
how do u get the humidity 2 go so low?
 
Try soda bottles filled with water in the freezer and they turn in the blox of ice and then you can sit them in your grow tent and have the fans blow over them to blow cool air on to your plants and the temperature in your grow tent will gradually lower ( depending on 10 size and how many blocks of ice you use oh and by the way you might want to sit the soda bottles in a container to catch the drip from the bottle as the ice melts)