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Thread: What kind of weed are they smoking.

  1. #1
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    What kind of weed are they smoking.

    The government says that weed make you a criminal and a murder. That has not happened to me or anyone esle that i smoked with(even a local cop).

    Where are these people that are so stoned from marijuana that they become Criminal and murders. Let's get them together and let them tell there story. Also, ask them how they got that way and kind of weed were they smoking?

  2. #2
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    I got an article that you can read. There are dates and time so you can prove what he said in his article.

    Dalton Camp of The Toronto Star wrote:

    Time to rethink the war on pot

    Many of the more enduring myths in our society are about marijuana.



    It has been for a hundred years the subject of propaganda, demonization, rabble rousing, and demagoguery; politicians and bureaucrats routinely lie about its effects on users, declarations the media routinely publish.

    A former director of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, in the United States, claimed that ``50 per cent of the violent crimes commited ... by Mexicans, Turks, Filipinos, Greeks, Spaniards, Latin-Americans and Negroes'' could be traced to ``abuse of marijuana.'' An anti-marijuana campaign, sponsored by the World Narcotic Defense Association, the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the International Narcotic Association claimed marijuana caused addiction, insanity, and sexual promiscuity. In 1974, the Senate Judiciary Committee of the American congress produced testimony saying marijuana diminished the ability to resist homosexual advances and made people more susceptible to Communist propaganda.

    These are citations from a review of the body of mythology that surrounds the subject of marijuana and the body of scientific evidence that disputes it, produced by John P. Morgan, MD and Prof. Lynn Zimmer.

    The book was published by the Lindesmith Center, a drug policy research institute, a decade ago, just three years after the Senate Judiciary Committee had reported America had been ``caught up in a marijauna-hashish epidemic'' which threatened to produce a society ``motivated by a consuming lust for self-gratification and lacking any higher moral guidance.''

    Most, if not all, of the misinformation about marijuana circulated among the general public has been produced by elected politicians and their appointed officials hired to promote the myths that hide the truth about the drug. In the protracted ``War on Drugs'' waged in the United States, the major casualties have been injuries to the truth.

    The most oft-repeated myths about marijauna are that the drug is highly addictive, that it leads to the use of harder drugs, that more severe punishment for possession leads to decreased public consumption, that marijuana kills brain cells, causes crime, damages the fetus, impairs the immune system, is more damaging to the lungs than tobacco, is a major cause of highway accidents, is more potent than it used to be and that it impairs memory and cognition and causes psychological impairment.

    Were all these true, they would represent a substantial indictment of the drug.

    But according to Morgan and Zimmer, they have no basis in scientific fact. Nonetheless, the authors find these myths repeated ``over and over'' in government correspondence, reports, newsletters, and press releases and in speeches by government officials and ``frequently in newspaper and magazine articles.''

    Among the more egregious and enduring myths is that marijuana is addictive. Not so, say Morgan and Zimmer:

    ``Epidemiological surveys indicate that the large majority of people who try marijuana do not become long-term frequent users. A study of adults in their 30s who were first surveyed in high school, found ... of those who had tried marijuana, 75 per cent had not used it in the past year and 85 per cent had not used it in the past month. In 1994, among Americans age 12 and older, 31 per cent had used marijuana sometime in their lives. Eleven per cent had used it in the past year and 2.5 per cent had used it an average of once a week or more. Only 0.8 per cent of Americans currently smoke marijuana on a daily or near daily basis.''

    The Lindesmith Center describes marijuana as ``by far the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States and in most other countries ... More than 70 million Americans have tried marijuana and more than 20 million have smoked it in the last year (1996).''

    Chasing and jailing people possessing or trafficking in marijuana has become an international sport for politicians, who create laws, and for the police who must enforce them. It has become an expensive and losing game.

    Meanwhile, the ``problem'' has been studied to death. In 1894, the Indian Hemp Commission found the moderate use of hemp drugs ``is practically attended by no evil results at all.'' The (U.S.) Panama Canal Zone Report, published in 1925, found ``There is no evidence ... that (marijuana) has any appreciable influence on the individual using it.''

    The Wooten Report (1969) in Britain, Canada's LeDain Commission (1970), the American Shafer Commission (1972), the Dutch (1972) and Australian (1977) commissions, and the National Academy of Sciences Report (1982) all reached the same conclusion as the Hemp Commission had a century ago.

    ``The smoking of cannabis,'' wrote the editors of Lancet, the British medical journal, ``even long term, is not harmful to health.''

    Recent medical research is leading to the potential use of cannabis, according to the Guardian newspaper, ``as a pain reliever, appetite stimulant and anti-nausea treatment.''

    In the United States, people are thrown in jail for possession. The courts in our country are overwhelmed by marijuana charges, and the time and work of the police are squandered in the hopeless efforts to stop people smoking marijuana.

    Why are we doing this to ourselves? The result is widespread public contempt for the law - whatever it is - as well as a shining example of political cowardice. We should demythologize and legalize the stuff.

    And tell our politicians to get off the pot.
    Last edited by Giantmdxj; 06-10-2004 at 10:18 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by King_Giant
    The government says that weed make you a criminal and a murder. what kind of weed were they smoking?
    I'm really stoned and I don't feel like killing someone. I think most of these people are doing crack and other bad drugs like it. The government just likes making weed look alot worse than it is.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TokinPunkGurl
    When or where did the govenment say this? Cuz i never heard of that. Its illegal, but i never heard of them say it makes ppl murder others.
    Reefer Madness, heard of it. Yeah, that was government a funded movie/propoganda about if you smoke reefer, you will go crazy and kill someone.

  5. #5
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    Never seen that movie. All we see now, is a comerical. What is the name of it?