Cannabis started to emerge as a major medicine in the United States during the mid-1800s and is often sold in tincture form by some drug manufacturers. It was introduced in the United States Constitution in 1850 as a treatment for many medical conditions in the history of medical cannabis including; neuralgia, disorders, typhus, dysentery, cholera, tetanus, leprosy, rabies, alcoholism, opiate addiction, anthrax, gout, incontinence, insanity, uterine bleeding, excessive menstrual bleeding, convulsive tonsillitis, Among others.

The use of cannabis for medical purposes was also reduced with the passage of the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937. The idea of the bill was to ban all non-medicinal uses of cannabis in the United States. It also had a significant reduction in the medicinal use of the purpose of the act was to prohibit all non-medical uses of marijuana in the United States.

Cannabis marijuana was officially banned for any use with the passage of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. Despite the strict federal ban in place, it gained renewed interest as a medicine in 1970 and 1980, in particular, because of testimonies that helped alleviate suffering and cancer, AIDS patients, as well as those suffering from a wide range of other medical conditions.

However, the Federal Government has made it clear that if a State has enacted a law to abolish the decriminalization of cannabis for recreational or medical use, it may do so, provided that there is a regulatory regime for cannabis.

Individual state laws are not always consistent with the national standard. State-level proposals to reschedule cannabis have been a mixed success. As of November 9, 2016, recreational and medical marijuana use has been codified in the states of Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Oregon

After a historic election cycle in which some countries pass voting initiatives that legitimize non-medical marijuana, making this the first time, one out of every five Americans will now lives in a state where it is legal to smoke marijuana without a doctor's letter, in the history of weed in American.

Donald Trump has been causing a lot of stir since he first came on the political scene. Rumors ranged before, during and after his campaign to support the legitimization to the desire to leave the issue in the hands of States. Therefore, the White House press secretary Sean Spicer announced in February of 2017 that the Ministry of Justice might strengthen the enforcement of marijuana laws came as a buzz for the masses. Now, many are wondering on marijuana policy under president Trump. What the rumors are and what the truth is.

The Americans voted in California, Massachusetts, and Nevada to legitimize cannabis for recreational use of adults. These states join Colorado and Washington, which voted to legalize weeds in 2012, Alaska, Oregon and Washington DC. National residents voted overwhelmingly to legalize non-medical marijuana in November 2014. The bill went into effect nearly a year ago, allowing people to own up to two ounces of pot and a "gift" up to one ounce if No money, goods or services are exchanged.

This means that cannabis will be taxed and regulated like alcohol instead of treated as a criminal institution



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