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Thread: New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

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    New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

    Researchers suggest the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on pulmonary disease, such as Hypertension, are due to an unindentified cannabinoid receptor. Abstract posted below.

    If you have any questions, please don't hesistate to ask.

    Regards,
    Jahan

    Identification of the vasodilatory endothelial cannabinoid receptor in the human pulmonary artery.Kozłowska H, Baranowska M, Schlicker E, Kozłowski M, Laudański J, Malinowska B.
    aDepartment of Experimental Physiology, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland bDepartment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany cDepartment of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland.

    BACKGROUND: The endocannabinoid anandamide is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypotension in haemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock. It has been demonstrated in animal, but not in human, vessels that the vasodilatory effects of anandamide and abnormal cannabidiol are partially mediated by an as yet unidentified endothelial cannabinoid receptor. Our study was performed to examine the influence of abnormal cannabidiol on the human pulmonary artery. METHODS: Isolated human pulmonary arteries were obtained from patients without clinical evidence of pulmonary hypertension during resection of lung carcinoma. Vasodilatory effects of abnormal cannabidiol were examined on endothelium-intact vessels preconstricted with serotonin or potassium chloride. RESULTS: Anandamide and abnormal cannabidiol relaxed serotonin-preconstricted vessels concentration-dependently. The effect of abnormal cannabidiol was reduced by endothelium denudation, pertussis toxin and two antagonists of the novel endothelial receptor, cannabidiol and O-1918, but not by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME given together with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. It was also diminished by blockade of calcium-activated potassium channels by the nonselective blocker tetraethylammonium or by combination of selective blockers of small (apamin) and intermediate and large (charybdotoxin) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. The potency of abnormal cannabidiol to relax vessels was lower in potassium chloride than in serotonin-preconstriced preparations. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal cannabidiol relaxes human pulmonary arteries in an endothelium-independent and endothelium-dependent manner. The latter component is probably mediated via the putative endothelial cannabinoid receptor, activation of which may release endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, which in turn acts via calcium-activated potassium channels. Abnormal cannabidiol is behaviourally inactive; it may have a therapeutic implication in vascular diseases, especially in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.
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    Re: New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

    [QUOTE=Jim Behr;687058]Researchers suggest the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on pulmonary disease, such as Hypertension, are due to an unindentified cannabinoid receptor. Abstract posted below.

    If you have any questions, please don't hesistate to ask.

    Regards,
    Jahan

    Identification of the vasodilatory endothelial cannabinoid receptor in the human pulmonary artery.Kozłowska H, Baranowska M, Schlicker E, Kozłowski M, Laudański J, Malinowska B.
    aDepartment of Experimental Physiology, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland bDepartment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany cDepartment of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland.

    BACKGROUND: The endocannabinoid anandamide is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypotension in haemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock. It has been demonstrated in animal, but not in human, vessels that the vasodilatory effects of anandamide and abnormal cannabidiol are partially mediated by an as yet unidentified endothelial cannabinoid receptor. Our study was performed to examine the influence of abnormal cannabidiol on the human pulmonary artery. METHODS: Isolated human pulmonary arteries were obtained from patients without clinical evidence of pulmonary hypertension during resection of lung carcinoma. Vasodilatory effects of abnormal cannabidiol were examined on endothelium-intact vessels preconstricted with serotonin or potassium chloride. RESULTS: Anandamide and abnormal cannabidiol relaxed serotonin-preconstricted vessels concentration-dependently. The effect of abnormal cannabidiol was reduced by endothelium denudation, pertussis toxin and two antagonists of the novel endothelial receptor, cannabidiol and O-1918, but not by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME given together with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. It was also diminished by blockade of calcium-activated potassium channels by the nonselective blocker tetraethylammonium or by combination of selective blockers of small (apamin) and intermediate and large (charybdotoxin) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. The potency of abnormal cannabidiol to relax vessels was lower in potassium chloride than in serotonin-preconstriced preparations. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal cannabidiol relaxes human pulmonary arteries in an endothelium-independent and endothelium-dependent manner. The latter component is probably mediated via the putative endothelial cannabinoid receptor, activation of which may release endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, which in turn acts via calcium-activated potassium channels. Abnormal cannabidiol is behaviourally inactive; it may have a therapeutic implication in vascular diseases, especially in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.[/

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    Re: New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

    I was diagnosed with COPD, 30% of my lungs are only good. They have opted for lung transplant or lung volume reduction as my only treatment available. I am 45 with a genetic disorder, all 3 of my sisters also have it. What are the understandable terms in this so I can understand if it's beneficial to use a vaporizer or eat edibles.
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    Re: New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

    hi.
    my grandmother, 80 yrs of age, is suffering from certain symptoms, namely hypertension, diabetic neuropathy and pulmonary hypertension. pulmonary hypertension is one of the most recent diagnosis she is having to face regular hospital admissions for. we have tried many doctors and many medications. they just seem to give her very short term support and she is always on artificially administered oxygen through a machine we have at home for her. after everything, some friends suggested i try my luck with finding cures using cannabis, or cannabinoids i guess,to be more precise. I am really desperate to know if something can be done to help her before its too late. also i'd like you to know i am from India. Pune city. any good outcome from your effort can mean a lot to me and my family firstly. And secondly, could mean a very positive story required for the outspread of cannabis research within our nation..which still seems to be closed minded towards it. looking forward to your reply. thanks

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    Re: New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

    Quote Originally Posted by kdawn View Post
    I was diagnosed with COPD, 30% of my lungs are only good. They have opted for lung transplant or lung volume reduction as my only treatment available. I am 45 with a genetic disorder, all 3 of my sisters also have it. What are the understandable terms in this so I can understand if it's beneficial to use a vaporizer or eat edibles.
    i have you found enything out.i to have copd and am on the same thinking as you please if find out enything id like 2 no thankyou.and hope your doing wellits hard i no.

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    Re: New Cannabinoid Receptor in Pulmonary Arteries

    hi is dope good for some 1 with copd thankyou.