Cannabis Enthusiasts Flock to Cleveland’s Farmer’s Market

    CLEVELAND, Ohio – With marijuana now legal in Ohio, dozens of cannabis enthusiasts descended over the weekend upon Cleveland’s East Side to see what Ohio’s budding cannabis industry had to offer.

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    Cleveland's Cannabis Farmers Market
    Cleveland's Cannabis Farmers Market

    On Sunday, OhioCannabis.com held its first ever farmer’s market at Red Space, an event space on Superior Avenue in the city’s Asiatown neighborhood. According to John Lutz, or “Johnny Cannabis,” the president and CEO of Ohio Cannabis, the market was attended by about 1,000 people. Attendees had the opportunity to speak with local vendors about how to grow and take care of their plants. Items were for sale such as seeds, plants and other growing equipment, along with crystals, candles, t-shirts and more.

    There also were demos on growing and a raffle, where people won various prizes like soil, seeds and more.

    “We had technically sold out at 700 and we didn’t turn anybody away at the door,” Lutz said. “We’ll never turn people away because we know they’re here for information and to get access to genetics so that they can go home and grow their own garden.”

    “And we want to have people see success early on so that they stay in the hobby. This is an amazing hobby and when you get to that boutique craft level in cannabis, there’s just nothing like it.”

    Happy Time Genetics, one of several vendors that were selling clones, a mini cannabis plant grown from the cutting of another plant, said that it was a “really good event” and were almost sold out of their plants.

    “People are really excited about Ohio changing the law,” Glenn Keeling of Happy Time said, referencing the November vote that legalized recreational marijuana, including home grow, and paved the way for eventual recreational marijuana sales at state-licensed dispensaries. “I think people are more positive and you’re finding people that normally wouldn’t come out to event that are now coming out because they want to know more information.”

    Rico Johnson of Sowhio Seeds, a Black-owned cannabis brand, echoed the same sentiment, noting that more people were “coming out of the closet.” Sowhio creates it own strains, some of which have Cleveland-inspired nicknames like Tower City. Johnson said he had received a lot of questions about his technique.

    “More people are asking about growing, tents, what lights to buy, wanting to know about about timers, and asking if we can FaceTime me to give them tips,” he said. ”It is definitely dope to be able to be legal, to walk with the plant, chill with the plant without worrying about being arrested.”

    Lutz, who created Ohio Cannabis in 2016, added that he hopes to do the farmer’s market monthly, and that his main goal was to show people what they legally can and cannot do now that marijuana is legal in Ohio, which he explained in a earlier demo at the event.

    But he also wanted people to have a hands on experience with cannabis.

    “This is a hands-on hobby. You can read books and you can watch videos, but to see something in person, it’s different. They were super excited to be a part of this and this is the first one, but this is going to have the same level of excitement from everyone here from here on out.”

    The next farmer’s market will take place in March in Circleville, a city about 30 minutes south of Columbus. More information about this and upcoming markets can be found on Ohio Cannabis’ website.