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Mississippi - Home To The Feds' Official Stash Of Marijuana

The General

New Member
Walk along the narrow, brightly lit beige hallway, along the washed-out linoleum floor, around the corner to the imposing steel vault. As a scientist swings open the door, a familiar, overpowering scent wafts out. Inside, marijuana buds are packed into thousands of plastic bags filed in bankers boxes. Fifty-pound barrels are brimming with dried, ready-to-smoke weed. Freezers are stocked with buckets of potent cannabis extracts. Large metal canisters sit, crammed full of hundreds of perfectly rolled joints. The vault even has boxes of "marijuana trash" – contaminated garbage that a crafty pothead might try to steal for a cheap high.

It is one of the nation's most impressive stockpiles of marijuana – and probably the most controversial. What makes the cannabis here on the campus of the University of Mississippi unique is that it is grown, processed and sold by the federal government. The stockpile represents the only source of pot allowed for researchers who want to conduct FDA-approved tests on using marijuana for medical purposes. Researchers can't get anything from the 46-year-old Marijuana Research Project at Ole Miss unless the Drug Enforcement Agency gives the go-ahead.

A panel on which the National Institute on Drug Abuse is represented often must sign off, too. Some prominent researchers complain approval is unreasonably tough for scientists whose work aims to find beneficial uses for the drug. "It is a bizarre situation," said Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. "The DEA is acting like this is 1935 and cannabis is this extremely dangerous substance."

Indeed, under federal law, the government classifies marijuana as a more dangerous substance than cocaine, one that has no medical use, even as people in 21 states and the District of Columbia can legally light up. The DEA guards the stockpile here as if it were plutonium. Devinsky, for example, is pursuing research involving a chemical in marijuana, known as CBD, which has recently shown promise in suppressing certain types of seizures. The storage vault here contains marijuana with high levels of the substance. But physicians can't easily get at it – nor can their patients, Devinsky said.

Meantime, patients in states with dispensaries can walk up to a counter and buy pot, but with no good information about whether it includes a lot of CBD or a little. Mahmoud ElSohly, the scientist who heads the marijuana team at Old Miss, is currently ramping operations back up at the 12-acre farm, which budget cuts have forced him to keep fallow since 2007.

He is laying the groundwork to grow 30,000 plants. As he does, he finds himself accused of colluding with the DEA to maintain a monopoly. But ElSohly, an Egyptian immigrant who has been in charge since 1980, is not so much a collaborator as a scientist stuck in a time warp. He is caught between marijuana researchers and a government agency that remains deeply suspicious of marijuana use even as it controls the million-dollar contract that funds his project. Just before taking visitors on a tour of an indoor grow room, where he will roll the buds from mature pot plants between his fingers and declare "I love it" as he talks of the rich fragrance, ElSohly ponders the possibility that it will all come to an end as legalization gains momentum.

"I could lose it," ElSohly said of his contract. "But so what? It would be just another research project that is terminated. I could start another. "Maybe if it becomes legalized, we could start producing high-quality materials for a pharmaceutical product," he adds. Then, he clarifies. "The liberalization of those laws really scares me," he says. "To have marijuana available just like that? I feel sorry for Colorado and Washington state. In a few years, you are really going to see the impact of the liberal laws they have there."

Not by smoking
Unlike other cannabis researchers, ElSohly says pot should never be smoked. You do that for a high, he said, and there are ways to move the curative chemicals into your system without getting stoned. For years, he has been trying to get approval to market a suppository. THC, the component of pot that makes people high, is "not absorbed through the rectum," he says. Business proposals like that have been a point of concern for critics, who accuse ElSohly of exploiting his insider status for profit.

The scientist notes that he has to jump through the same hoops as every other researcher to get trials approved. He doesn't dare bend the rules, he says, since his contract depends on the DEA, and other institutions are eager to have it. In 2007, a DEA administrative law judge ruled that the University of Massachusetts, too, should be permitted to grow pot for research. Top officials at the DEA overruled her.

Not a user himself
Standing inside his grow room, where hundreds of small plants sit on metal grates, illuminated by industrial-scale lamps hanging from chains hooked to the 30-foot-high ceiling, ElSohly confides that he has never ingested the stuff himself. "Never ever," he says. "And I can say that with a straight face," he adds. "It doesn't make sense for me to be working with a controlled substance and be using that controlled substance." That abstinence has made for awkward moments at cannabis conferences.

"They are always asking ElSohly and me to smoke," said Zlatko Mehmedic, who was a narcotics official in Yugoslavia before joining ElSohly as a top deputy in 1995. Inside the vault, Mehmedic grabs one of the thousands of baggies of buds sent to him for analysis by law-enforcement agencies. Researchers here have been monitoring the increasing potency of pot sold on the street. A few puffs of the rich, green product he is holding could put a novice user in the emergency room, Mehmedic warns. By contrast, he notes, the Mississippi researchers can say almost nothing about the strength or content of the products sold in licensed dispensaries.

"I would very much like to be able to get some of the materials available in dispensaries, look at them, analyze them, compare them with everything else around," ElSohly said. "But I was categorically told by the DEA, 'You cannot receive materials from a non-DEA registrant.' " Meanwhile, the university's pot farm remains a source of great interest on campus.

Mehmedic looks into the distance at a cluster of student housing abutting the farm's outer security fence and smiles. In addition to farming, there is also some fishing that goes on at the Marijuana Research Project, he says. "They try, you know, to fish," Mehmedic says of the students, mimicking the motion of casting a line over the fence in an attempt to reel in a pot plant. All the anglers ever catch are visits from security. But, Mehmedic adds, still "they try."

Buds57.jpg


News Moderator - The General @ 420 MAGAZINE ®
Source: Seattletimes.com
Author: Evan Halper
Contact: Contact Us
Website: Mississippi, home to the feds official stash of marijuana
 

tokerace

New Member
Walk along the narrow, brightly lit beige hallway, along the washed-out linoleum floor, around the corner to the imposing steel vault. As a scientist swings open the door, a familiar, overpowering scent wafts out. Inside, marijuana buds are packed into thousands of plastic bags filed in bankers boxes. Fifty-pound barrels are brimming with dried, ready-to-smoke weed. Freezers are stocked with buckets of potent cannabis extracts. Large metal canisters sit, crammed full of hundreds of perfectly rolled joints. The vault even has boxes of “marijuana trash” — contaminated garbage that a crafty pothead might try to steal for a cheap high.

It is one of the nation’s most impressive stockpiles of marijuana — and probably the most controversial. What makes the cannabis here on the campus of the University of Mississippi unique is that it is grown, processed and sold by the federal government. The stockpile represents the only source of pot allowed for researchers who want to conduct FDA-approved tests on using marijuana for medical purposes. Researchers can’t get anything from the 46-year-old Marijuana Research Project at Ole Miss unless the Drug Enforcement Agency gives the go-ahead.

A panel on which the National Institute on Drug Abuse is represented often must sign off, too. Some prominent researchers complain approval is unreasonably tough for scientists whose work aims to find beneficial uses for the drug. “It is a bizarre situation,” said Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The DEA is acting like this is 1935 and cannabis is this extremely dangerous substance.”

Indeed, under federal law, the government classifies marijuana as a more dangerous substance than cocaine, one that has no medical use, even as people in 21 states and the District of Columbia can legally light up. The DEA guards the stockpile here as if it were plutonium. Devinsky, for example, is pursuing research involving a chemical in marijuana, known as CBD, which has recently shown promise in suppressing certain types of seizures. The storage vault here contains marijuana with high levels of the substance. But physicians can’t easily get at it — nor can their patients, Devinsky said.

Meantime, patients in states with dispensaries can walk up to a counter and buy pot, but with no good information about whether it includes a lot of CBD or a little. Mahmoud ElSohly, the scientist who heads the marijuana team at Old Miss, is currently ramping operations back up at the 12-acre farm, which budget cuts have forced him to keep fallow since 2007.

He is laying the groundwork to grow 30,000 plants. As he does, he finds himself accused of colluding with the DEA to maintain a monopoly. But ElSohly, an Egyptian immigrant who has been in charge since 1980, is not so much a collaborator as a scientist stuck in a time warp. He is caught between marijuana researchers and a government agency that remains deeply suspicious of marijuana use even as it controls the million-dollar contract that funds his project. Just before taking visitors on a tour of an indoor grow room, where he will roll the buds from mature pot plants between his fingers and declare “I love it” as he talks of the rich fragrance, ElSohly ponders the possibility that it will all come to an end as legalization gains momentum.

“I could lose it,” ElSohly said of his contract. “But so what? It would be just another research project that is terminated. I could start another. “Maybe if it becomes legalized, we could start producing high-quality materials for a pharmaceutical product,” he adds. Then, he clarifies. “The liberalization of those laws really scares me,” he says. “To have marijuana available just like that? I feel sorry for Colorado and Washington state. In a few years, you are really going to see the impact of the liberal laws they have there.”

Not by smoking
Unlike other cannabis researchers, ElSohly says pot should never be smoked. You do that for a high, he said, and there are ways to move the curative chemicals into your system without getting stoned. For years, he has been trying to get approval to market a suppository. THC, the component of pot that makes people high, is “not absorbed through the rectum,” he says. Business proposals like that have been a point of concern for critics, who accuse ElSohly of exploiting his insider status for profit.

The scientist notes that he has to jump through the same hoops as every other researcher to get trials approved. He doesn’t dare bend the rules, he says, since his contract depends on the DEA, and other institutions are eager to have it. In 2007, a DEA administrative law judge ruled that the University of Massachusetts, too, should be permitted to grow pot for research. Top officials at the DEA overruled her.

Not a user himself
Standing inside his grow room, where hundreds of small plants sit on metal grates, illuminated by industrial-scale lamps hanging from chains hooked to the 30-foot-high ceiling, ElSohly confides that he has never ingested the stuff himself. “Never ever,” he says. “And I can say that with a straight face,” he adds. “It doesn’t make sense for me to be working with a controlled substance and be using that controlled substance.” That abstinence has made for awkward moments at cannabis conferences.

“They are always asking ElSohly and me to smoke,” said Zlatko Mehmedic, who was a narcotics official in Yugoslavia before joining ElSohly as a top deputy in 1995. Inside the vault, Mehmedic grabs one of the thousands of baggies of buds sent to him for analysis by law-enforcement agencies. Researchers here have been monitoring the increasing potency of pot sold on the street. A few puffs of the rich, green product he is holding could put a novice user in the emergency room, Mehmedic warns. By contrast, he notes, the Mississippi researchers can say almost nothing about the strength or content of the products sold in licensed dispensaries.

“I would very much like to be able to get some of the materials available in dispensaries, look at them, analyze them, compare them with everything else around,” ElSohly said. “But I was categorically told by the DEA, ‘You cannot receive materials from a non-DEA registrant.’ ” Meanwhile, the university’s pot farm remains a source of great interest on campus.

Mehmedic looks into the distance at a cluster of student housing abutting the farm’s outer security fence and smiles. In addition to farming, there is also some fishing that goes on at the Marijuana Research Project, he says. “They try, you know, to fish,” Mehmedic says of the students, mimicking the motion of casting a line over the fence in an attempt to reel in a pot plant. All the anglers ever catch are visits from security. But, Mehmedic adds, still “they try.”

Buds57.jpg


News Moderator - The General @ 420 MAGAZINE ®
Source: Seattletimes.com
Author: Evan Halper
Contact: Contact Us
Website: Mississippi, home to the feds official stash of marijuana
A few puffs of the rich, green product he is holding could put a novice user in the emergency room, ElSohly confides that he has never ingested the stuff himself. “Never ever,” he says. “And I can say that with a straight face,” he adds. “It doesn’t make sense for me to be working with a controlled substance and be using that controlled substance.” ................I have seen first time users freek out, I have never seen one go to the emergency room. I can see how that could happen. BUT, if used properly with supervision at first, anyone will get over that PARANOIA that the Government has instilled into every ones brain in the past. So the scientist knows everything thats in it, yet has NEVER used it in any way? That in itself is a joke. I think this article was controlled by the DEA. When the Government and Big business gain full control of it , THEN it will be legal.
 

CoronaSmith

New Member
Wow. I don't know where to start. One I never in my life heard of anyone going to the hospital after smoking any type of cannabis. I'm sure it may happen from time to time but I've never heard or seen it. Two with the hundreds of scientific reports out there proving cannabis helps certain conditions, ailments, diseases, side effects, etc why is the government still sticking to it has no medical use? Three most if not all of the paranoia I've ever felt has been worrying about being busted for smoking. Four since when is feeling good a bad thing? Smoking has greatly improved my moods, helps with my severe back pain which in turn I've completely stopped taking all the narcotic pain meds that my dr tries to cram down my throat. Five how can anyone have a valid opinion on something without ever experiencing it's effects? So the government has cannabis grown to sell to researchers who in all these years never reported there findings? Give me a break. Fuck government and trying to tell me how to live my life. I will do as I please and they can go to hell.
 

patmonk

New Member
The height of hypocrisy and hubris, typical of corrupt federal agencies that manipulate rules and regulations to control the people, deny their rights and freedoms, and ultimately favor their paymasters.
 

bobrown14

Grow Journal of the Month: Dec 2017 - Photo of the Month: May 2020
"A few puffs of the rich, green product he is holding could put a novice user in the emergency room...."

It can happen - a few years ago when Blueberry Kush came out (medical grade) I got a big bag full. Our son whom has Epilepsy wanted to try it to see if it would help his condition any, which at the time was the beginning of folks with certain types of Epilepsy would benefit from Cannabis. Anyway long story short, he didn't know he was supposed to puff puff give give and bogarted a nice size bowl full in like 5 minutes .... bang in a couple minutes he was freaking out, was going to call 911 and get taken to the emergency room.. a little panic. I had to talk him down off the 911 call. I knew he'd be alright after the initial panic wore off but still, I had to keep him from calling, of course the police would have come first and probably arrested him and me and not go to the emergency room.

So when you read "not for the novice smoker"; yah take heed on that. I've seen it with my own 2 eyes.

Cheers
 

tokerace

New Member
he didn't know he was supposed to puff puff give give and bogarted a nice size bowl full in like 5 minutes Way to go Bob. Like I said , supervision
 

bobrown14

Grow Journal of the Month: Dec 2017 - Photo of the Month: May 2020
he didn't know he was supposed to puff puff give give and bogarted a nice size bowl full in like 5 minutes Way to go Bob. Like I said , supervision

He was/is and adult and supervised... "hey here's some weed man ... watch your step ... se ya later"; yeah no. He was in college thought he knew how to share!! Go figure; "what the heck are they teaching the kids these daze!" sheesh, I think I heard my dad say that at some point when I was younger.

Philadelphia legalize it!
 

tetonmoon61

New Member
Wow. I don't know where to start. One I never in my life heard of anyone going to the hospital after smoking any type of cannabis. I'm sure it may happen from time to time but I've never heard or seen it. Two with the hundreds of scientific reports out there proving cannabis helps certain conditions, ailments, diseases, side effects, etc why is the government still sticking to it has no medical use? Three most if not all of the paranoia I've ever felt has been worrying about being busted for smoking. Four since when is feeling good a bad thing? Smoking has greatly improved my moods, helps with my severe back pain which in turn I've completely stopped taking all the narcotic pain meds that my dr tries to cram down my throat. Five how can anyone have a valid opinion on something without ever experiencing it's effects? So the government has cannabis grown to sell to researchers who in all these years never reported there findings? Give me a break. Fuck government and trying to tell me how to live my life. I will do as I please and they can go to hell.


No they are growing all of that with tax payers money and had; as over 2 yrs ago, never approved any University or others for research. NEVER> The only research is done by this fruit cake ( if you ever saw him in interviews the man is clearly whack) and only to find negative effects. He is not even allowed to find anything medicinal or non toxic.. that is not what WE THE PEOPLE are paying him for.. Its wrong but what does this government do that is not wrong? And yes him being able to do the only research should be illegal and he should not be able to EVER get a patent on any findings since he is an employee of the people. Israel has been doing solid drugs studies on cannabis for decades and has all the empirical science to prove its value and disprove the lies but we have a bunch of fucked up government , DOJ and LEOs running our program. Until we start hanging just about everyone in government for the treason they have committed we are fucked.
 

drama420

New Member
ughhhh.. i live right outside of oxford ,ms were ole miss college is. its bullshit that down the street 15 mins they are growing tons of medicine and i cant legally grow my own . many years ago it was on the news here that a few guys were caught snagging buds over a 10 foot fence with treble hooks and fishing poles . i believe all growing is done indoors there now ..i read an article in a magazine that showed how they pre rolled joints and sent them in a can similar to a coffee can to a few patients..weres my coffee can ?
 

patmonk

New Member
Who is this "Doctor" ElSohly. Has he ever studied physiology. Has he ever practiced medicine. What are his qualifications to be appointed to such a position. The rectal membranes are suffused with blood supply and highly permeable to most every medicine you can name. They are as effective a route of administration as the oral mucosa and in many cases can be preferable as this route avoids gastric degradation and hepatic first pass. As a Hospice RN with over 15 years of practice in the field providing direct care to patients I can state unequivocally that this a common method of administration and produces excellent results. He sounds typical of the ignorant, uneducated dupes that the FDA, DEA, NIDA etc; appoint and rely on as 'experts'. I find it bizarre that he would even raise the issue. I never thought that folks pushing pot up their tail-pipe was a big problem. I would welcome any substantiation of his assertion. Even "Doctor" Gupta, official shill for the Stanley Bandits and their Realm of Cash, has more credibility than this character. Be highly suspicious of ANY claims made by the government or it's 'experts' concerning cannabis.
Patrick Monk. RN Hospice Case Manager. SF. Ca.
**Society of Cannabis Clinicians.
**American Cannabis Nurses Association.
**For Identification Only.
http://goo.gl/8OUwyv
 
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