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If Cannabis Is Legalized, Portugal Could Be A Window Into California's Future

Ganjarden

Nug of the Month: Aug 2008
Despite the monetary promise of increased state and local revenues, and lowered costs for an already strained justice system, the Tax Cannabis Act still has some Californians worried.

Fox News' San Francisco-based correspondent, Claudia Cowan writes that "Critics, including most law enforcement groups, say legalizing pot will only hurt California."

As a guest on Freedom Watch, Judge Andrew Napolitano's new libertarian-minded Fox Business program, Sarah Palin recently said that police should focus more on "other problems" and less on recreational cannabis use. The former Alaskan governor qualified that statement, however, stating that actually legalizing cannabis would send the wrong message to society- that legalization encourages people to use the drug.

Whatever arguments Tax Cannabis advocates may be able to muster in favor of their initiative, opponents can't shake the feeling that legalization would bring along with it increased drug abuse and all of its unsavory societal effects.

If cannabis advocates want to convince skeptics to vote for legalization in November, no amount of fiscal or economic analysis will be enough. Nevertheless, skeptics need to be assured that legalizing cannabis will not result in the deterioration of their communities and neighborhoods.

What will California look like 10 years from now if the Tax Cannabis Act becomes law? A look at Portugal's drug policy might help provide a window into California's future.

Ten years ago, the European nation decriminalized the recreational use of all drugs (a reform that makes the Tax Cannabis Act quite modest by comparison). The BBC reminds us that "there were warnings the policy would be disastrous and that the country would become a European haven for drugs tourism."

A decade later, Portugal has not only managed to avoid becoming a festering, unsavory trainwreck of rampant drug addiction and ruined lives- its drug situation has actually improved. By all indications, the country has more positive statistics on drug use than any other in the Eurozone as well as compared to the United States.

According to TIME Magazine, when Portugal made its sweeping drug reform in 2001, it "had some of the highest levels of hard-drug use in Europe." Only five years later, "illegal drug use among teens in Portugal declined and rates of new HIV infections caused by sharing of dirty needles dropped, while the number of people seeking treatment for drug addiction more than doubled." And:

"Following decriminalization, Portugal had the lowest rate of lifetime marijuana use in people over 15 in the E.U.: 10%. The most comparable figure in America is in people over 12: 39.8%. Proportionally, more Americans have used ******* than Portuguese have used marijuana."

In 2001 many people in Portugal felt exactly the same way some Californians may feel about drug decriminalization now, and it's perfectly understandable that someone would feel that way. But ten years later, the Portugese have found that legalizing drugs- even hard drugs- didn't wreck their communities or even cause a spike in drug use.

If Portugal is any indication, California has nothing to fear from legalizing the possession of a small amount of pot.


NewsHawk: Ganjarden: 420 MAGAZINE
Source: CAVIN
Author: W. E. Messamore
Contact: CAVIN
Copyright: 2010 CAIVP, 501(c)4 organization
Website: If Cannabis Is Legalized, Portugal Could Be A Window Into California's Future
 

Choji

New Member
shall we follow a good example
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
Sorry but as long as the fed considers it illegal... Californians are in danger. Also with the Rogue DEA agent running and implementing his playbook for the whole DEA you can expect more arrests regardless of the laws enacted by Californians. This so called legalization will only fuel the false sense of security... not sure if you watched the man in CO. get arrested for doing what was lawful and now face federal prison.

We need a law that will hold our elected officials accountable... until then this bill will do nothing more than fill our prison system.
 
Sorry but as long as the fed considers it illegal... Californians are in danger. Also with the Rogue DEA agent running and implementing his playbook for the whole DEA you can expect more arrests regardless of the laws enacted by Californians. This so called legalization will only fuel the false sense of security... not sure if you watched the man in CO. get arrested for doing what was lawful and now face federal prison.

We need a law that will hold our elected officials accountable... until then this bill will do nothing more than fill our prison system.

amen
 

SnowBender

New Member
^^^I dont just want prohibition lifted, I want punishment for those that gleefully supported the racist and anti-religious drug war gestapo thats been terrorizing US citizens for far, far too long.
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
^^^I dont just want prohibition lifted, I want punishment for those that gleefully supported the racist and anti-religious drug war gestapo thats been terrorizing US citizens for far, far too long.

Amen to that as well :bravo:

I honestly think people are blinded by this bill. I want legalization as well but I want it done right with prisoners of war released and the true criminals arrested for not obeying the will of the people. We are the nation as the constitution starts with... "We the people!!!"
 

Ganjarden

Nug of the Month: Aug 2008
I'd love to see everyone that is hating on this bill do something better. This isn't perfect but my god it's so much better than what there is now. The feds can still go after medical patients if they want to. As to filling the prisons hello that's what is going on right now every 36 seconds someone goes to jail for weed and it has happened to me. So you fear mongering does not do any good. Why not try to move forward like this bill will do.
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
Sorry sir but I feel that you are wrong... who do you think will fair well with a jury or the news... someone usinging our beloved plant for rec use or a patient in wheelchair??? Sorry but patients being harrassed over their meds brings more sympathy than rec users. Again... the fix is to hold these elected officials and LE accountable and then we can win this.
 

Ganjarden

Nug of the Month: Aug 2008
Well if they state law is cannabis is legal I think the rec user will not be arrested. Your are scared of the unknown and post your fears on every single thread even remotely having to do with this. What ulterior motives do you have that you feel you must try to scare everyone into voting no?
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
None, however it can be said as well... what motivates this bill??? money, mass production of weed to take the eyes off of others who do the dirty work and money over incarceration, as this bill only works for 21 and over and not 18 and over which is included in the high incarceration rates. I am like this... I am not going to let people walk into a trap. I hate seeing people go to jail... and I am sorry but this bill will not stop that. However if we hold elected officials and LE accoutable they will not mess with marijuana anymore and both sides of the fence will win. That is the way I see it.

Also I am not scared of the unknown... I have posted facts from the Norml site which backs up my posts.... 15-24 are the ones being arrested at an alarming rate and it keeps going up. This bill you are backing only cover 21 and over. Also the new appointed leader of the DEA is the arresting co. citizens for doing what is legal in co. so how is that fear propoganda?

Also I want people to hear both sides... not just one side which can land them into a whole bunch of trouble. If I am right people stay out of jail... if this bill is wrong... it will be business as usual... people going to jail.
 

Choji

New Member
I'm in agreement with Ganjarden, yes there may be some casualties, but if it doesn't happen now we may not get another chance for years. isn't that how it goes? every few years the people get a sudden wave of clarity and we get a chance then it fades. if we wait how many more will be incarcerated while we wait for our next chance. I personally believe that this may be the biggest civil rights battle since the time of segregation. And when those black leaders and protesters were arrested they kept faith and stayed strong. their strength then gives me the strength now to stand strong. we all need to stand strong
 

Wingman420

420 Member
I personally do not live in California and am currently out on bail facing a 20yr min and $1million fine for growing meds for myself (Adult Patient) and others who I am a State Licensed Caregiver for. There are people being arrested in CA, CO, RI, and Maine who are trying to obey laws and live within the guidelines current legislation allows, yet we are still going to prison. I don't get the crowd that says "lets take this deal or law,cause we might not get another shot at it."
I was with organized labor and saw this many times in Contract negotiations and Collective Bargaining. What about having an optimistic attitude and saying this bill could be better here or there and if it fails we will only come back stronger with realistic demands next year. Instead of cowtowing and trying to negotiate with an element that does not respect us but wants us in chains behind prison walls and bars we should put forth legislation that truly reflects all the freedoms this country was founded on. Man up nobody gives respect or power away it must be earned, demanded,and taken.

Right now current MMJ legislation isn't being honored by cops or justice and thru litigation there has been some redress. I do not support taxing my meds to satisfy some bureaucratic lifetime politician who will never respect us no matter how rich he gets on MMJ or mj. I am disabled and only support the full repeal of a failed policy of Prohibition and punishment. Only when marijuana is fully legal will we not fear the lying Nazi strormtrooper tactics and behavoirs of cops gone wild with greed and avarice. Let the police, FBI and all other four lettered agencies solve real crime. We need legislation that reflects current proven policies from all over the world and our own past. It would be great to see exactly whats what in Portugal.

Great story Ganjarden and I support all respectful discussions on both sides of the topic and welcome all information that can move the discussion and cause further ahead.
I do believe that we as a Nation should repeal Marijuana Prohibition PERIOD.
No 5sq ft, Tax seals or 6 plants or 36 plants that was a start lets finish the job with true and full legalization and end this oppressive Prohibition.

Our federal position on marijuana has been making third world countries trillions of dollars when the simple plant can be grown in a backyard or closet.
If we as a Nation were strong willed and strong minded we could repeal this just as the the 21st Amendment ended a 14yr Prohibition we too must end our Prohibition and stop incarcerrating marijuana users
Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Lemon Paradise

New Member
None, however it can be said as well... what motivates this bill??? money, mass production of weed to take the eyes off of others who do the dirty work and money over incarceration, as this bill only works for 21 and over and not 18 and over which is included in the high incarceration rates. I am like this... I am not going to let people walk into a trap. I hate seeing people go to jail... and I am sorry but this bill will not stop that.

It leaves the laws the way they are now for under 21... but it would make it legal for the over 21 crowd. I cannot see denying, millions of adults the ability to smoke, legally, because people under 21 will not be able to toke legally... What is CA's drinking age.. is it 18? is it 21? I would believe that any mind altering substance should have a minimum age, and it should be the same as whatever the min age for alcohol is, in that state..


However if we hold elected officials and LE accoutable they will not mess with marijuana anymore and both sides of the fence will win. That is the way I see it.
wishful thinking,, that would be nice,, but how often do you win, when you sue town hall?


Also I am not scared of the unknown... I have posted facts from the Norml site which backs up my posts
9 year old stats,, that is..

.... 15-24 are the ones being arrested at an alarming rate and it keeps going up.

yes, but the 21-24 will be legal, the 18-20 will have to be smarter, and under 18 shouldn't have any, anyways..

This bill you are backing only cover 21 and over. Also the new appointed leader of the DEA is the arresting co. citizens for doing what is legal in co. so how is that fear propoganda?
I believe he had over a hundred plants,, slightly over what is legal in CO... he did make a stupid statement about going into dispensaries,,, so yes, his motives are definately in question

Also I want people to hear both sides... not just one side which can land them into a whole bunch of trouble. If I am right people stay out of jail... if this bill is wrong... it will be business as usual... people going to jail.

I agreee.. people should be able to hear both sides. the discussion about this, and bringing the topic out in the open, especially bringing it to the attention of non-smokers, is probably one of the most important aspects of this initiative..

Personally though, if it becomes legal in CA, then it will make other states lok at it. If it helps CA with their budget, great, and other states will surely look at it serioulsy. It is a great start, it will allow adults to grow their own, and enjoy it recreationally. It will allow police to focus on other crimes, it will allow public smoking establishments to be created, it will PREVENT employers from piss testing (or firing because of a positive mj test), bring prices down, and could open up new career opportunities (recreational MJ grow room engineer/ personal trainer,, comes to mind)..

the only negatives I really see, is that it will still be illegal on a fed level, it does restrict ( a little too much) the size of your grow space, current commercial growers will lose money due to prices coming down (not bad for us,, just them), and sorry, the 18-21 crowd will have to be smarter about their MJ consumption..
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
NORML 2008 Conference: “The War on Pot Is a War on Young People” | NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform

Sorry but if you read this from the norml site you will see that the stats are from 2005.

Again... I say like you... so we pass a law which will increase access and countinue to allow our youth to be incarcerated because adults want to smoke their weed??? I say no... especially with how easy it is to get a card with the ability to have 8oz on your person and grow up to 6 mature plants.

We need a law which protects our youth... not lead them to prison. Sorry I am not buying it. Yes the 18 and over crowd will have to be smarter about it... but honestly they are not... and the latest stats shows arressts climbing. I am not talking about the 9yr/old stats either but in one of the other threads it shows it increase as of 2007 I believe at about 2% every year.

OK... here you go, I finally found it: Campaign for Liberty - Reclaim the Republic. Restore the Constitution.

Specific findings from drugscience.org include the following:

1) Nationally, there is little apparent relationship between increasing marijuana arrests and rates of use.

Marijuana arrests have nearly doubled from 1991 to 2009, increasing by 150% during the 1990s and increasing steadily in recent years, producing an annualized change of 6.56% per year during this period.
Overall, levels of marijuana use in the United States have remained fundamentally unchanged during this period. Population estimates of annual marijuana use, for example, have remained relatively constant over the last five years at approximately 25 million individuals.
From 2003 to 2007, the number of annual marijuana arrests increased by 2.93% per year, while the number of annual marijuana users decreased by 0.21% per year.
The overall marijuana arrest rate of between 3% and 6% of users is not enough to represent a meaningful deterrent.


Also here again from the latest stats from the above articles:

) Young people and African-Americans are disproportionately affected by marijuana arrests.

Males aged 15 to 24 account for 52% of all marijuana arrests. While the national rate of marijuana possession arrests is 248 per 100,000, the arrest rate for males aged 15 to 19 is 1,911 per 100,000.
While the marijuana-use rate for African-Americans is only about 25% greater than for whites, the marijuana possession arrest rate for blacks is three times greater. This is not a regional disparity, but is seen in every state and most counties.

So again... I do not understand.... we legalize marijuana at the sacrafice of our youth???? I for one will not be a part of that. If you want to... that is your choice.

Again the key is... hold elected officials and LE accoutable then legalize it for 18 and over by the will of the people. Then use prevention methods for those under the age of 18.
 

Choji

New Member
"The Man's" brutality is nothing to be taken for granted, but i don't believe that the local law enforcement is going to be obsessed with carding everyone who's smoking so that they can cart them off to jail. It doesn't really happen with alcohol and I don't think it will be a big problem with cannabis. For it to become a serious problem there would have to be some serious violations of your civil liberties to check and see how many plants you have, how many oz.s your in possession of, how old you are. not to say that they won't, I just believe that the local law enforcement would rather not be bothered by it. Meaning that the DEA would have to be the ones to bust the multitudes of recreational and medicinal users. I just believe that the bill, even if it's not perfect, is a major leap in the right direction. I mean we know that cannabis is one of the safest substances on earth but a lot of Americans still believe that is a dangerous narcotic.
 

Lemon Paradise

New Member
NORML 2008 Conference: “The War on Pot Is a War on Young People” | NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform

Sorry but if you read this from the norml site you will see that the stats are from 2005.

sorry, I was originally quoting the first set of stats you posted on another thread...

this one states
74 percent of all Americans busted for pot are under age 30, and 1 out of 4 are age 18 or younger. That’s nearly a quarter of a million teenagers arrested for marijuana violations each year.
so, 25% of arrests are minors under 18...
this is also on that site,,, going over why kids get arrested more

Why is this the case? And why, as a community, don’t we talk about it?

There are several reasons why young people are far more likely, statistically, to be busted for weed than those over age 30. Most obviously, young people are more likely than their counterparts to smoke pot, and toke more frequently. They’re also more likely to indulge in places that will inadvertently attract law enforcement’s attention: in parks, dorm rooms, cars, dimly lit parking lots. Let’s face it, most teenagers aren’t going to go home and smoke weed in their room while their parents are home, though if they did, it’s far less likely they’d ever be arrested for it (of course, it’s possible that their parents’ might face legal repercussions, but that’s another story.)

Young people are also more likely to have frequent interactions with sellers of weed, an activity that also increases their likelihood of one-day being arrested. Of course, it’s not that young people enjoy hanging around drug dealers, but it’s that young people typically have less disposable income, which means they have to buy their pot in smaller quantities on more frequent occasions.

Young people are also more likely to take risks — and they’re also more likely to commit traffic violations. Both these actions, though unrelated to marijuana per se, greatly increase the likelihood that young people will have face-to-face contact with law enforcement, and this contact often ends in a pot arrest.

most of this will not change, unfortunately, kids will take risks, are usually much more aggressive drivers, and usually do not know their rights, and can easily be manipulated... but by making it legal, it will allow adults to enjoy MJ, bring in much needed revenue for the state, bring it to the attention of elected officials, and hopefully make it such a low priority that LEO will go after other issues,, like violent crime


Again... I say like you... so we pass a law which will increase access and countinue to allow our youth to be incarcerated because adults want to smoke their weed??? I say no... especially with how easy it is to get a card with the ability to have 8oz on your person and grow up to 6 mature plants.

that is part of the problem,, if 'anyone' can get a med card, then everyone thinks it's a joke. MAke it legal for rec use, within reason, then actually regulate the med market, so someone with a hang-nail cannot get a med card. and the laws may be respected a little more...

We need a law which protects our youth... not lead them to prison. Sorry I am not buying it. Yes the 18 and over crowd will have to be smarter about it... but honestly they are not... and the latest stats shows arressts climbing. I am not talking about the 9yr/old stats either but in one of the other threads it shows it increase as of 2007 I believe at about 2% every year.

OK... here you go, I finally found it: Campaign For Liberty — Oregon Cannabis Tax Act (OCTA)

Specific findings from drugscience.org include the following:

1) Nationally, there is little apparent relationship between increasing marijuana arrests and rates of use.

Marijuana arrests have nearly doubled from 1991 to 2009, increasing by 150% during the 1990s and increasing steadily in recent years, producing an annualized change of 6.56% per year during this period.
Overall, levels of marijuana use in the United States have remained fundamentally unchanged during this period. Population estimates of annual marijuana use, for example, have remained relatively constant over the last five years at approximately 25 million individuals.
From 2003 to 2007, the number of annual marijuana arrests increased by 2.93% per year, while the number of annual marijuana users decreased by 0.21% per year.
The overall marijuana arrest rate of between 3% and 6% of users is not enough to represent a meaningful deterrent.


Also here again from the latest stats from the above articles:

) Young people and African-Americans are disproportionately affected by marijuana arrests.

Males aged 15 to 24 account for 52% of all marijuana arrests. While the national rate of marijuana possession arrests is 248 per 100,000, the arrest rate for males aged 15 to 19 is 1,911 per 100,000.
While the marijuana-use rate for African-Americans is only about 25% greater than for whites, the marijuana possession arrest rate for blacks is three times greater. This is not a regional disparity, but is seen in every state and most counties.

you forgot this part of the article
2) There are wide disparities between states in both marijuana arrest rates and the severity of penalties. These differences bear little relationship to rates of use, while the penalty structure actually serves as a price support for the illicit market.

•Thirteen states have decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana, and Georgia mandates probation for such offenses.
•However, 30 states, plus the District of Columbia, have maximum penalties of six months to a year in jail for possession of about one ounce of marijuana. State law in Florida provides for a maximum penalty of five years. For possession of two ounces of marijuana, 18 states have maximum penalties of one year, and 16 have maximum penalties of more than one year, including maximum sentences of 10 years in Arkansas, Georgia, and Oregon and seven years in Missouri.
•This penalty structure effectively demands that marijuana consumers make multiple small purchases of marijuana over time. This works to prop up the price of marijuana and benefits the illegal market.
•These laws, by making marijuana an attractive commodity for small-scale sales, have created a substantial market in which teenagers sell marijuana to other teenagers, making marijuana easily accessible to young people. According to the 2007 NSDUH, 742,932 youths aged 12 to 17 sold illegal drugs in the preceding 12 months. •The national marijuana arrest rate is 290 per 100,000. The jurisdictions with the highest marijuana arrest rates are the District of Columbia (677), New York (481), and Kentucky (479). The states with the lowest are Vermont (149), Montana (145), and Hawaii (119).
•While some decriminalized states, such as Maine and Colorado, have high rates of marijuana use, others, including Mississippi and Nebraska, have below-average rates of use.
•Some states, including South Carolina and Missouri, have among the highest arrest rates of marijuana users but low levels of marijuana use, while Washington, D.C. has both a high arrest rate and a high rate of use. Utah and North Dakota have low levels of use and below-average arrest rates, while states such as Alaska, Massachusetts and Montana have low arrest rates and high levels of use.

specifically the part in bold.. by making it legal for adults, and lowering the prices, it will make it less attractive for the small scale sales, so younger people will not be as tempted to sell drugs, (which they do not have the common sense about them to stay safe or discreet while doing so, making themselves a bigger target).. so it will help our youth, by taking that temptation away, also, younger kids (sorry.. girls..) can be very vindictive,, so I would assume that alot of kids get busted because a girl or ex-friend ratted them out...


So again... I do not understand.... we legalize marijuana at the sacrafice of our youth???? I for one will not be a part of that. If you want to... that is your choice.

Again the key is... hold elected officials and LE accoutable then legalize it for 18 and over by the will of the people. Then use prevention methods for those under the age of 18.
it should be the same age as the legal drinking age in the state.. IMO anyways.. also, since when are elected officials or LEO held accountable? :19: seriously, it would be great if that were the case,, however, if this is made legal, it will put more pressure on officials to recognize it,, if it fails it will empower the officials to continue this draconian war against innocent, hard-working, individuals..

also from that article..
Below is some of what Dr. Ron Paul had to say...

"Alcohol prohibition in the 1920's brought similar violence, gangs, lawlessness, corruption and brutality. The reason for the violence was not that making and selling alcohol was inherently dangerous. The violence came about because of the creation of a brutal black market, which also drove profits through the roof. These profits enabled criminals like Al Capone to become incredibly wealthy, and militantly defensive of that wealth. Al Capone saw the repeal of Prohibition as a great threat, and indeed smuggling operations and gangland violence fell apart after repeal. Today, picking up a bottle of wine for dinner is a relatively benign transaction, and beer trucks travel openly and peacefully along their distribution routes.

Similarly today, the best way to fight violent drug cartels would be to pull the rug out from under their profits by bringing these transactions out into the sunlight. People who, unwisely, buy drugs would hardly opt for the back alley criminal dealer as a source, if a coffeehouse-style dispensary was an option. Moreover, a law-abiding dispensary is likely to check ID's and refuse sale to minors, as bars and ABC stores tend to do very diligently. Think of all the time and resources law enforcement could save if they could instead focus on violent crimes, instead of this impossible nanny-state mandate of saving people from themselves!

If these reasons don't convince the drug warriors, I would urge them to go back to the Constitution and consider where there is any authority to prohibit private personal choices like this. All of our freedoms -- the freedom of religion and assembly, the freedom of speech, the right to bear arms, the right to be free from unnecessary government searches and seizures -- stem from the precept that you own yourself and are responsible for your own choices. Prohibition laws negate self-ownership and are an absolute affront to the principles of freedom. I disagree vehemently with the recreational use of drugs, but at the same time, if people are only free to make good decisions, they are not truly free. In any case, states should decide for themselves how to handle these issues and the federal government should respect their choices." Dr. Ron Paul (congressman)
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
One thing you are forgetting about this fact... it will still fetch good money to kids via the black market. Again... this law will make it legal for 21 and over... so the black market for kids to kids sale will still be there just at a possible lower price.

Also the med deal is not a joke as it is the same reason people use beer when they get home.... the need to relieve stress from the day or just as a relaxation therapy.
 

Lemon Paradise

New Member
One thing you are forgetting about this fact... it will still fetch good money to kids via the black market. Again... this law will make it legal for 21 and over... so the black market for kids to kids sale will still be there just at a possible lower price.

Also the med deal is not a joke as it is the same reason people use beer when they get home.... the need to relieve stress from the day or just as a relaxation therapy.

I think the black market thing for kids still will be unknown,,, sure they will want to still do it,, I think education is key there, (like you said), but there is no money for any education, never mind about MJ, (or personal finance, or work ethic, or responsibility, or... you know what I mean) maybe if some of the taxes from MJ sales went to actual education to the kids, then it may have a positive impact,,,

as for the med thing,,, right now, being able to get a card for just about anything, is what makes it look like a scam to non-smokers, and prohibitionist backers.. make it legal for adults, then they can relax after a hard day's work with a beer or a joint.. and not claim it is for med purposes...
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
We will see come november. I hope all of you are right and I am very wrong. I want legalization so bad... but worry about our youth being put in the system.
 

GanjaAL2

New Member
I never said an increase but the continued increase as those under 21 will still be unable to use marijuana legally.

Marijuana arrests have nearly doubled from 1991 to 2009, increasing by 150% during the 1990s and increasing steadily in recent years, producing an annualized change of 6.56% per year during this period. (could be a result of the enactment of the mmj bills)

Males aged 15 to 24 account for 52% of all marijuana arrests. Again in accordance to business... usually with supply demand will go up for certain comodities. Now with it being easy access chances of these stats remaining the same with continual growth should be the same or go up.

Hope that answers your question sir.

P.S. forgive me for spelling... not my fortay.
 
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