Stickydank's Basic CO2 Method

No I have not, and I completely understand where your coming from. You hit the nail on the head, I'm a "no pic no proof" kinda guy! I wasn't for one second stating that Co2 will NOT benefit plants, I'm just saying with all this time in effort going into this yeast sugar concoction has anyone tested the actual benefit ppm wise? Saying simply it will help the plants isn't satisfying to me, I'm a solid number kinda guy. I feel like most of the growers who use this sugar yeast method are small scale ops that have so much variance between cycles that saying they noticed an improvement could be caused by a number of variables. If someone could give me a solid number that would definitely put my mind at ease and hell I'd probably go make my own. Even in my case, if I added this concoction to my op it would be hard to tell a noticeable difference because although growing does take a miniscule amount of skill it takes a majority of experience. My next batch is always better then the one before it because I, just like all other growers, refine their methods and techniques to apply to your next batch of plants. So saying their was an improvement over your last batch doesn't tell me much because your next batch should ALWAYS be better then your last.

Dear Stoned4daze61,
Are you 61? Anyway, Kool. Like my dad used to always say (he was an Artist & Teacher) "An Artist is 3% Talent and 97% practice". You hit on some valid and important points which I missed. Esp. the fact that our next grow automatically should have a difference (hope 4 the better!) from the previous, if just for the tiny experience, and so on. Practice makes perfection. Unfortunately, I learn from the school of hard knocks.

So, as far as CO2 goes, so many factors, most overlooked, contribute to success. A simple closet grow and the brewery concoction is an excellent way to experiment and find out if one even has the discipline to manage this small set-up. Believe me, the larger the footprint and more advanced CO2 generation, the larger the problems, BUT the larger the gains (like penny stock v. 3 digit). At the least, the "concoction" helps mask smells if this be an issue. I have thought of using it solely for this purpose (x-tra wouldn't hurt). So cheap and E-Z. If visitors have to happen, one can always say "I'm makin' my own wine, did you know you can brew XX gallons legally?" and onwards to the next topic. Plausible and out of sight... I tried and grew up with all the different methods I could find and arrived at where I'm at (LP gen. +/-15 cu ft/hr using automatic Atmospheric controls Blooming area 1450 ft3) after necessity.I learned an awful lot, hopefully without too much waste and expense. I believe, from my heart of hearts, that it is worthwhile. BUT then it will only be as successful as the commitment one gives to it, as well as their performance and dedication. AND if one addresses all the issues to 100% perfection, then will one have a chance. Weakest link rule applies here, big-time. Simple air infiltration and leakage are the worst enemy's. It is hard to completely be air-tight. You'll know you are when you have difficulty opening/closing the door. Elevating the level to 1500 PPM isn't difficult (with capable equipment), keeping it there w/o heat issues is another. It takes a lot of trial and error to get the air thing worked out. I have to tweak it all the time and it is in my daily must verify list right after all the plants and equipment have been dealt with.
I don't think I have ever seen anyone actually document a grow with and without CO2. It would be very interesting. Until someone does this, everyone is going to remain the same way that they are.
Again a diatribe, sorry... :thanks:
 
Here is a good write up for doing C02 I hijacked from somewhere on the net.:thanks:


FERMENTATION METHOD OF CO2 ENRICHMENT:

Sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol and CO2 when it ferments due to the action of yeast. In this method, the following ingredients and equipment are needed:

1. Suitably sized container, plastic or glass

2. Sugar, common or invert

3. Yeast, brewers or bourgelais wine yeast

4. Yeast nutrient

5. Sealant, cellophane, tape or lid

6. 1/4 plastic tubin

7. 1/4 shutoff valve

8. Balloon

9. Starter jar or bottle

A pound of sugar will ferment into approximately half a pound of ethyl alcohol (C2H5OH) and half a pound of CO2. One pound of CO2 makes 8.7 cubic feet of CO2 gas at normal atmospheric conditions. In our standard 8 X 8′ X 8′ grow room, you will need to generate 512 cu. ft. X .0013 (1300 PPM CO2) = 0.66 cubic feet of CO2 every four hours. It takes time for the yeast to ferment sugar, so the size of container you should use in determined by dividing the cubic feet of growing area (512 Cu. ft.) by 32 = 16 gallons.

A convenient container to use here would be a plastic kitchen garbage can. These are inexpensive and easily obtainable.

To determine how much sugar we need for six weeks of operation or until fermentation ceases, the following calculations are necessary: From the above paragraph, we need 0.66 cu. ft. of CO2 every four hours. If one pound of CO2 makes 8.7 cu. ft. of CO2, we will need 0.08 lbs. of sugar, but because every one pound of sugar only makes 1/2 lb. of CO2, we must double the amount of sugar needed, i.e. 0.08 X 2 = 0.16 lbs. of sugar every four hours. Since there are six four-hour periods in a 24 hour day, the amount of sugar we need is 0.16 x 6 or 0.96 lbs. of sugar per day.

If we round this off to one pound of sugar per day, we will need 42 lbs. of sugar in six weeks. We must consider that only 80 to 90% of the sugar will be completely converted in this length of time, therefore, we should actually use about 48 lbs. of sugar in six weeks.

The sugar solution to start with is 2 1/2 to 3 lbs. per gallon. You can use hot water to start with, as sugar dissolves faster in it than in cold water. You must let it cool to 80-90 degrees F before adding yeast to it or the yeast will be killed. Start with the fermenting container only half-full as you will be adding an extra gallon per week for 6 weeks. Begin with eight gallons per week and 24 lbs. of sugar.

To start the solution fermenting, you will want to make a "starter batch" of sugar water, yeast and yeast nutrient. To do this, use a coke or beer bottle (approx. one pint), dissolve 1/4 lb. of sugar in 10 oz. of warm water (approx. 3/4 full), add a pinch of yeast and two pinches of yeast nutrient to this sugar mixture. Place a balloon on the bottle and set in warm location, 80 to 90 degrees F, for one to two days or until the balloon expands and small bubbles are visible in the solution.

After the starter solution has begun fermenting vigorously, it is added to the main fermentation tank at the same temperature already mentioned. After a day or so, to see that the system is working properly and that CO2 is being generated, close the valve to the supply tube and, if the unit is sealed properly, the balloon should expand in a short period of time. To regulate the amount of CO2 being delivered to the plants, open the valve until the balloon is only half the size of full expansion.

The CO2 supply tube with in-line valve should have a 2″ loop in it half full of water to serve as an air-lock. This loop can be held in place with tape on the side of the fermentation tank. The open end of this tube can either be positioned in front of a circulating fan or run through "T" fittings to make additional tubes, the ends of which can be positioned above your plants. Remember, CO2 is heavier than air and it will flow downwards.

Once per week, undo a corner of the Saran Wrap and add an extra gallon of sugar solution and yeast nutrient, then reseal the top with tape. Use three lbs. of sugar and one teaspoon of nutrient per gallon.

After the last gallon is added, after six weeks of operation, let fermentation continue until the balloon goes down and no more bubbles are visible in the "U" tube. When this point has been reached, taste the solution. If is it sweet, fermentation is not complete and a new starter batch should be made and added to the tank. More yeast nutrient should also be used. If the solution is dry (not sweet) like wine, fermentation has stopped and the alcohol content has killed the yeast. At this point, it's time to clean your tank and start a new batch.

The fermentation process is quite good for generating CO2 and relatively inexpensive. Regular or invert (corn) sugar is inexpensive and available. You may have to purchase invert sugar at a wine supply store. This method of generating CO2 will cost approximately 50 to 60 cents per day.

To save money on extra yeast, you can either take out approximately a gallon of fermenting liquid and save for the next batch, or start a second system identical to the first and alternate themóclean and replenish one, then three weeks later, clean and replenish the second.
 

mangosnapper

Well-Known Member
A pound of sugar will ferment into approximately half a pound of ethyl alcohol (C2H5OH) and half a pound of CO2. One pound of CO2 makes 8.7 cubic feet of CO2 gas at normal atmospheric conditions. In our standard 8 X 8' X 8' grow room, you will need to generate 512 cu. ft. X .0013 (1300 PPM CO2) = 0.66 cubic feet of CO2 every four hours. It takes time for the yeast to ferment sugar, so the size of container you should use in determined by dividing the cubic feet of growing area (512 Cu. ft.) by 32 = 16 gallons.
 
Here is a good write up for doing C02 I hijacked from somewhere on the net.:thanks:


FERMENTATION METHOD OF CO2 ENRICHMENT:

Sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol and CO2 when it ferments due to the action of yeast. In this method, the following ingredients and equipment are needed:

1. Suitably sized container, plastic or glass

2. Sugar, common or invert

3. Yeast, brewers or bourgelais wine yeast

4. Yeast nutrient

5. Sealant, cellophane, tape or lid

6. 1/4 plastic tubin

7. 1/4 shutoff valve

8. Balloon

9. Starter jar or bottle

A pound of sugar will ferment into approximately half a pound of ethyl alcohol (C2H5OH) and half a pound of CO2. One pound of CO2 makes 8.7 cubic feet of CO2 gas at normal atmospheric conditions. In our standard 8 X 8′ X 8′ grow room, you will need to generate 512 cu. ft. X .0013 (1300 PPM CO2) = 0.66 cubic feet of CO2 every four hours. It takes time for the yeast to ferment sugar, so the size of container you should use in determined by dividing the cubic feet of growing area (512 Cu. ft.) by 32 = 16 gallons.

A convenient container to use here would be a plastic kitchen garbage can. These are inexpensive and easily obtainable.

To determine how much sugar we need for six weeks of operation or until fermentation ceases, the following calculations are necessary: From the above paragraph, we need 0.66 cu. ft. of CO2 every four hours. If one pound of CO2 makes 8.7 cu. ft. of CO2, we will need 0.08 lbs. of sugar, but because every one pound of sugar only makes 1/2 lb. of CO2, we must double the amount of sugar needed, i.e. 0.08 X 2 = 0.16 lbs. of sugar every four hours. Since there are six four-hour periods in a 24 hour day, the amount of sugar we need is 0.16 x 6 or 0.96 lbs. of sugar per day.

If we round this off to one pound of sugar per day, we will need 42 lbs. of sugar in six weeks. We must consider that only 80 to 90% of the sugar will be completely converted in this length of time, therefore, we should actually use about 48 lbs. of sugar in six weeks.

The sugar solution to start with is 2 1/2 to 3 lbs. per gallon. You can use hot water to start with, as sugar dissolves faster in it than in cold water. You must let it cool to 80-90 degrees F before adding yeast to it or the yeast will be killed. Start with the fermenting container only half-full as you will be adding an extra gallon per week for 6 weeks. Begin with eight gallons per week and 24 lbs. of sugar.

To start the solution fermenting, you will want to make a “starter batch” of sugar water, yeast and yeast nutrient. To do this, use a coke or beer bottle (approx. one pint), dissolve 1/4 lb. of sugar in 10 oz. of warm water (approx. 3/4 full), add a pinch of yeast and two pinches of yeast nutrient to this sugar mixture. Place a balloon on the bottle and set in warm location, 80 to 90 degrees F, for one to two days or until the balloon expands and small bubbles are visible in the solution.

After the starter solution has begun fermenting vigorously, it is added to the main fermentation tank at the same temperature already mentioned. After a day or so, to see that the system is working properly and that CO2 is being generated, close the valve to the supply tube and, if the unit is sealed properly, the balloon should expand in a short period of time. To regulate the amount of CO2 being delivered to the plants, open the valve until the balloon is only half the size of full expansion.

The CO2 supply tube with in-line valve should have a 2″ loop in it half full of water to serve as an air-lock. This loop can be held in place with tape on the side of the fermentation tank. The open end of this tube can either be positioned in front of a circulating fan or run through “T” fittings to make additional tubes, the ends of which can be positioned above your plants. Remember, CO2 is heavier than air and it will flow downwards.

Once per week, undo a corner of the Saran Wrap and add an extra gallon of sugar solution and yeast nutrient, then reseal the top with tape. Use three lbs. of sugar and one teaspoon of nutrient per gallon.

After the last gallon is added, after six weeks of operation, let fermentation continue until the balloon goes down and no more bubbles are visible in the “U” tube. When this point has been reached, taste the solution. If is it sweet, fermentation is not complete and a new starter batch should be made and added to the tank. More yeast nutrient should also be used. If the solution is dry (not sweet) like wine, fermentation has stopped and the alcohol content has killed the yeast. At this point, it’s time to clean your tank and start a new batch.

The fermentation process is quite good for generating CO2 and relatively inexpensive. Regular or invert (corn) sugar is inexpensive and available. You may have to purchase invert sugar at a wine supply store. This method of generating CO2 will cost approximately 50 to 60 cents per day.

To save money on extra yeast, you can either take out approximately a gallon of fermenting liquid and save for the next batch, or start a second system identical to the first and alternate themóclean and replenish one, then three weeks later, clean and replenish the second.
I make my own hootch, have for many years. If you want to get intense CO2 buy "Turbo Yeast". You can get it at any of the on-line suppliers to the liquor industry. I'd put up links but then they'll take them down because they are not sponsors here, but a google search for "alcohol stills" will get you there...
Turbo Yeast is a different formulation, needs NO NUTRIENTS. Simply add to sugar and water, then the yeast, and you'll be pumping out CO2 almost immediately. Nothing else fancy needed. The only factor to consider is that this yeast will exhaust itself faster than brewers yeast. It is made to produce the highest level of Alcohol available! It will keep producing until the sugar is gone...
 
yeah it does work the best setup is using five gallon buckets they seal just fine without the silicone just by putting the lid on and if anyone is looking for any recipes just look up moonshine mash, or beer recipes that's all it is (minus the toast that is unnecessary)
 

Zine

New Member
You could exercise
Throughout my entire grow ops i am constantly speaking with the plants while im doing work on them whether its feedings, waterings, trimming, LST, topping. On the topic of how much CO2 in my opinion any CO2 can benefit your gardens. This method is effective and does the job. I use empty two liter bottles of soda usually two or three of them in the room at a time that last for about two weeks. Once the yeast ferments and starts to smell of alcohol i do it all over again. Great video that shows the DIY.

S2: How To Make Co2 (Fast, Easy & Cheap) - YouTube
 
Throughout my entire grow... CO2 ... Once the yeast ferments and starts to smell of alcohol ...
The funky smell from fermentation (if have e'nuff) is excellent at masking that sweet, pungent, sexy, aromatic, awesome, exciting fragrance that comes from our lovely Cannabis Plants...
 

Skybound

Well-Known Member
Great F#$%ING Thread!!!! Has my wheels spinning for sure. I'd like to make an observation from logic and ask a question to get more info shared.

1) Observation. if the growing area can be sealed air tight, whatever CO2 that is introduced will be uptaken by the girls so measuring and keeping highest levels possible will be easier to achieve. I like the idea of using an air pump as it can be set on a timer to emit when air is not being circulated through the inlet and exhaust. Plus, it being a pump and all can be made to pull the gas up to the top and released to fall down on the tops.

2) Question? Would it be possible to divert the Propane CO2 generators into a staging area to separate the rising heat from the falling gas? Don't know how that exhaust works, but if it can be separated, the heat can be bled off the top and the wanted gas can be bled off the bottom.

Just my thoughts.
 
Great F#$%ING Thread!!!! Has my wheels spinning for sure. I'd like to make an observation from logic and ask a question to get more info shared.

1) Observation. if the growing area can be sealed air tight, whatever CO2 that is introduced will be uptaken by the girls so measuring and keeping highest levels possible will be easier to achieve. I like the idea of using an air pump as it can be set on a timer to emit when air is not being circulated through the inlet and exhaust. Plus, it being a pump and all can be made to pull the gas up to the top and released to fall down on the tops.

2) Question? Would it be possible to divert the Propane CO2 generators into a staging area to separate the rising heat from the falling gas? Don't know how that exhaust works, but if it can be separated, the heat can be bled off the top and the wanted gas can be bled off the bottom.

Just my thoughts.
I think you could channel the heated air through an air to air heat exchanger (Google it) like those used in newer homes. For a couple hundred bucks you could safely remove the heat but I think other methods mention in this tread are more cost effective.
 
I like the 5 gal. bucket,sugar and yeast method but ,forget the bread due to mold issues.Afer one week or so you are ready to make moonshine! Buy a small still on ebay and make a few pints of vodka. Turbo yeast is the best to use as it will not quit from a high content of shine.
 
Humidity dome with small home brew Co2 set up for clones/seedlings

I just started testing the following idea for my Humidity dome set up.
I think this is a sweet idea for seedlings and clones and a cheap way in managing getting Co2 to the clones and seedlings Humidity dome.

This works not kidding I used this idea for 6 clones in a closet set up and it indeed kicks butt.
I seen sweet changes quick and the clones started to grow at a faster rate with 24 hours of installing the cheap little Co2 set up.

I use a CO2 digital analysis I bough for about $34.95.to help manage the amount of Co2 of around 1500 PPM in my small area set up.

I pondered on the idea this worked so good for my clones in the closet why not set up a home brew Co2 system for my humidity dome set up.

I did down size the home brew Co2 system for the humidity dome.

Picture of Humidity dome with home brew Co2 set up for clones/seedlings

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Material needed:

1 gal milk jug with screw lid not pop on and a 28 oz gatorade bottle with lid.
3ft of fish tank air line,tube of fix all adhesive or good glue from the dollars store works great,philips screw driver,3 cups sugar,1 pk of yeast,5 cups warm water.


How to make for small Co2 Humidity dome set up:

1.Take the gatorade bottle and with the philips screw driver push it into the top of the gatorade bottle lid making a hole then next to that hole make another hole the same way.

2.Next take and make one hole in top of the milk jug lid.
3.Take and cut the fish tank air line tube so you have one piece 24 inches long and other 12 inches.

4.Take the 24 inch piece fish aie line tube and install it into the top of milk cap so it is about 1 1/2 inches into the top of the lid and the other end push into one of the holes in the top of gatorade bottle lid and push it tell the air line tub go's all the way to the bottom of the gatorade bottle.

5.take the small fish tank air line 12 inch piece and push it into the 2nd hole in the top of the gatorade bottle only about 1 1/2 inches in the other end will be pushed into your humidity dome later.

6.Glue and let dry the top of both the Milk and gatorade bottle lids.

Ok after all that is done lids are dry let's mix up the Co2 mixture and install the other end of the gatorade bottle tube into the humidity dome with your clones or seedlings.

1.The Mixture is easy take the 3 cups of sugar and pour it into the one gal milk jug then add the 5 cups of warm water and shake it to mix sugar up.

2.Take the yeast and mix in a small cup with about 1/3 cup warm water stir with spoon to mix up good and pour it into the milk jug and again shake it up to mix yeast and sugar real good.now put about 1 cup of water into the gatorade bottle.

3.Put the lid on both the milk jug and gatorade bottle and place both next to your Humidity dome and run the fish tank tube the one that isnt being used yet into the side vent of the Humidity dome.

That is it done you will see air bubbles in a few minutes coming out of the tube that is in the gatorade bottle water and this is your Co2 that will feed your young clones or seedlings.

I shake the milk jug every morning to give it a good kick start and it runs all day if and when it stops working simply dump it out and refill with new warm water, 4 cups sugar and yeast your set again.

I do this and it works If you build one let me know how it worked out for you.
 
There's 2 easy methods for adding co2, 1. Take a half full 2 liter pop bottle, fill with warm water and ad a bakers yeast packet, set on a shelf and forget it. 2. If you use say a gallon jug to water your plants, get a straw and blow into the water for 30 seconds to a minute and then water. Remember the KISS principle, keep it simple stupid!