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What An Old Time Grower Told Me

Harry Lyme

New Member
He said what you want under your growing plants is not so much rotted vegetable matter as ROTTING veg. matter. Because rotting veg matter puts off gases and complex molecules that plants love to feed off of. My wife makes a lot of this , cantelope and watemellon rinds, old potatoes that have gone bad, any kind of veg. food that has gone bad. Eggshells. I throw it all in the compost pile, this year i'm going to put some of the unrotted stuff right under my plants when i put them in the ground....
 

Selfmeduk

New Member
He said what you want under your growing plants is not so much rotted vegetable matter as ROTTING veg. matter. Because rotting veg matter puts off gases and complex molecules that plants love to feed off of. My wife makes a lot of this , cantelope and watemellon rinds, old potatoes that have gone bad, any kind of veg. food that has gone bad. Eggshells. I throw it all in the compost pile, this year i'm going to put some of the unrotted stuff right under my plants when i put them in the ground....
I like the idea of this [emoji1316] keep us posted
 

Jedthedog

Well-Known Member
Organic compost yes is a very good thing and we use a lot of it. However I would think that putting rotting fruits and vegetables under your plants outside would invite unwanted bugs and animals to your plants ..Happy Growing ..
 

Harry Lyme

New Member
Seems like it would work in any kind of soil. I haven't tried it out yet myself though. This guy did have a master's in biology and was an old time gardener...
 

flytier

Well-Known Member
Seems like it would work in any kind of soil. I haven't tried it out yet myself though. This guy did have a master's in biology and was an old time gardener...
I have my bachelor's in environmental biology but gardening is pretty new to me. I may give it a go when I do a transplant.
 

freed

Well-Known Member
back in the day, i lived near a stream/small river that suckers would migrate up
we'd wade in, catch a few, and put them about 2 feet in the ground, and put our seedlings on top
never had to fertilize, didn't get any animals or bugs
and it was in the woods
they grew very well, very healthy
 

flytier

Well-Known Member
back in the day, i lived near a stream/small river that suckers would migrate up
we'd wade in, catch a few, and put them about 2 feet in the ground, and put our seedlings on top
never had to fertilize, didn't get any animals or bugs
and it was in the woods
they grew very well, very healthy
I work in aquaculture and I just brought home another 5-gallon bucket of last year's salmon compost. Same thing only different. Fish is supposed to be a top-notch fertilizer.
 

freed

Well-Known Member
kinda
we always just called them suckers
i looked them up and i guess they're called white suckers (scientific name - Catostomus commersoni)
pacific northeast, common names bay fish, brook sucker, common sucker, and mullet
bottom feeders
 

Harry Lyme

New Member
Potato peels, rinds, rotten tomatoes and such like all goes in a white bucket in the garage, then when that get full it goes on the compost pile. But if you leave it in the bucket for a couple weeks it starts to liquify. This looks like really good stuff to me....
 

Harry Lyme

New Member
Organic compost yes is a very good thing and we use a lot of it. However I would think that putting rotting fruits and vegetables under your plants outside would invite unwanted bugs and animals to your plants ..Happy Growing ..
You may be right about the idea of burying fresh compost material under new plants. On guerilla grows where they are not protected by chicken-wire. I had one of my best plants dug up out of the ground by i think a fox which sniffed this rotting garbage out nine inches below the ground. (recounted in another thread.) They have tremendous noses and they love to dig and they don't have anything better to do than dig up your shit in the middle of the nite. They're a worse threat than "the authorities"
 
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