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Scanmask for fungus gnats

wohlichen

New Member
hey everyone i've been researching a lot on fungus gnats and been battling them for a little while i found scanmask (Steinernem feltiae) nematodes and mixed in to the top inch of soil in all pots, i also ground up mosquito dunks and added that as well i was just curious if anyone else has had success with these
 

wohlichen

New Member
they are little round pucks for standing water for mosquitos but work on fungus gnats also, from what i've read contains BTi organism like gnatrol but are cheap at a harware store
 

wohlichen

New Member
well its been five days since i applied the scanmask 10 days since i added the crushed dunks, the critters are still crawling but i think it is decreasing the population more time will tell for sure

i'm still curious if anyone out there has used the scanmask nematodes??
 

wohlichen

New Member
well today is the 29th and i believe the nematodes mixed with the BTi is working well
i havn't noticed any gnats flying around anywhere for the last three days and no new ones are stuck to the traps...so this seems to be a good combo, i have used imdacloprid just for house plants without noticing the same effects from this application and i've tried the old method of drying out plants but it never works and stresses them well hopefully i solved the fungus gnat problem in our houseplants and sprayed them for preventative i don't want those fuckers getting in my room

i guess thats all i have to say about what i have been doing about that
i can't belive no one has anything to say about this????:smokin2:
 

420

Founder
420 Staff
Please try our sponsor Sierra Natural Science for Fungus Gnats, Root Aphids, Thrips, Shore Flies and White Flies.
SNS203
SNS-203™ Concentrated Natural Pesticide Soil Drench and Foliage Spray is made up of pure Rosemary and Clove botanical extracts. The botanicals are all food grade GRAS (generally recognized as safe) materials. SNS-203™ Concentrated Natural Pesticide Soil Drench is exempt from EPA registration under minimum risk pesticides exempted under FIFRA section 25(b).

SNS-203™ Kills and Repels Fungus Gnats, Root Aphids, Thrips, Shore Flies and White Flies.

How It Works
High moisture levels in soils and around pots encourage the development of fungus gnats, shore flies and other pests.
Fungus gnats will feed on fungi and decaying organic material in the soil. If a fungal food source is not readily available, fungus gnats may feed directly on plants. During the propagation of cuttings, fungus gnats may feed upon the callus. This may slow down or completely inhibit rooting. They can also damage the roots as they feed upon seedlings and potted plants. On many thick and succulent stemmed plants, larvae may tunnel into stems and cause plants to wilt and die. Larval feeding upon young roots encourages the development of root and stem rots such as Pythium. When this occurs, plants will be stunted with reduced growth and leaf drop.
Shore flies feed upon algae and do not directly feed upon plants. However, their frass (droppings) on plants, in addition to their presence, may be objectionable to customers and may carry other diseases.
SNS-203™ Concentrated Natural Pesticide Soil Drench active ingredients, attack fungus and algae and cause the pests to dehydrate their body fluids and dry up.
When used as a foliage spray SNS-203™ will control and eliminate Greenhouse Thrips, Fungus Gnats, Root Aphids, White Flies and Shore Flies.

Our Product has been tested in our lab on delicate new growth, clones, cuttings, tomatoes, roses and other plants.
 

hydrorod

New Member
Riddle your grow area with sticky traps either hung or stuck up around plant pot level. Change out as needed. One can always make their own with index cards and tangle foot smeared on them. Works wonders. Also for damping off which most attracks them I use seed shield covering from the seedman.com it is a mixture of Neem leaf ground up with vermiculite. Either one of these two remedies really wipes them out.
 

Icemud

Member of the Month: July 2012, July 2014 - Nug of the Month: July 2012
I have tried all of those supposed solutions/mixes/pesticides/soil drying and they all do very little with the fungus gnat larvae...... I have sprayed them directly with neem, azatrol, azamax, pyrethium and even used Bti dunks and none of these work on killing all of the larvae.....might kill 40% of them...but I have found a solution that kills 100% of the larvae you can see.....check it!!!!

I read on a forum about hot/boiling water killing fungus gnat larvae...I did not want to water with boiling water for fear of what it would do to my benificial microbes as well as my roots.....but....

Last night I was high, very high, and thinking about the whole fungus gnat issue and hot water...then it dawned on me....I have a clothes steamer that puts out a very hot stream of steam....will this work>>>>???

This morning I began to cultivate/turn my top 1" of soil, and with each flip, hundreds of larvae were waving back at me, feasting on my roots. Each time I turned the soil, I would hold the steamer to the fungus gnat larvae and they would almost instantly die!!!!! I used all of the above products and none of them sprayed directly on the larvae was killing them...but now...I have a 100% solution... I know that I will have to repeat this for the next week or so...but it works!!!! try it!!!

Please check my grow journal for the details on my fungus gnat battle...the link is below!!! leave me some comments as well...just turned to 12/12 4 days ago and my Scrog is looking really nice!!!!
 

Captain Kronic

Member of the Month: July 2011
Here, if non of that other stuff works, sand and peroxide the lil bastards... it takes some commitment though:

Getting rid of the adults is a snap: simply give them a sticky yellow surface to land on, and within a few days you'll have enough dead adults to make a tasty dinner of gnat casserole (YMMV). The larvae are a bit trickier. The first step toward getting rid of them is to starve your plant of water for a few days, letting the top layers of soil dry completely. Larvae cannot develop in dry soil, though they can survive a drought by suspending their development. Don't worry about killing your plant; it takes serious dedication to kill most houseplants from underwatering, while overwatering a plant can kill it very quickly.

Once the soil is dry, mix 1 part hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with 4 parts water. Use 3% solution, which you can find in any drug store or in the hygiene/medicine aisle of a chain grocery store. You can use a stronger solution if you change the water mixture appropriately, and don't be too concerned with proportions; it would take a very high concentration of H2O2 to hurt your plants. Just make sure you buy pure H2O2 with no chemical additives! Hydrogen peroxide is often sold as a topical disinfectant, and things that are good for your wounds may not be so healthy for your plants.

Water your plants as you normally would, using the hydrogen peroxide solution and taking care to get good coverage of the entire top layer of soil. Use a spray bottle if desired. The soil will fizz for a few minutes after application; this is natural. The gnat larvae die on contact with the H2O2. After a few minutes the fizzing stops and the H2O2 breaks down into oxygen molecules (which your plants don't mind) and water molecules (which your plants love).

Congratulations! You've just successfully treated your fungus gnat infestation. Monitor the gnat population for a few days with sticky cards, in order to make sure you've got them all. Make sure not to overwater, and consider sometimes adding a little hydrogen peroxide to your daily waterings--in my experience, the plants react well to this little treat. Watch your plants grow big and strong and enjoy the fruits of your labors, whether they be flowers, vegetables, literal fruits, or big sticky nugs of homegrown chronic.

Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is a clear sharp smelling substance very similar in appearance to water (H2O). Like water it is made up of Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2), however H2O2 has an extra Oxygen atom in an unstable arrangement. It is this extra atom that gives H2O2 its useful properties. H2O2 has been used for many purposes including cleaning, bleaching, sterilizing, rocket fuel, animal feed treatment and in addition many miraculous claims about its health benefits have been made. This article isn't about any of these; instead it will concentrate on horticultural applications. H2O2 is of great use for both hydroponics and dirt/soilless gardening.

What Does Hydrogen Peroxide do?
H2O2 is an unstable molecule, when it breaks down a single oxygen atom and a molecule of water is released. This oxygen atom is extremely reactive and will attach itself to either another O- atom forming a stable Oxygen molecule or attack a nearby organic molecule. Both the stable and O- forms will increase the level of dissolved oxygen. This is the method by which H2O2 is beneficial. Pre treating the water supply with H2O2will drive out the Chlorine many cities use to sterilize it. This will also degrade any pesticides or herbicides that might be present as well as any other organic matter. Well water can be high in methane and organic sulfates, both of which H2O2 will remove. Many disease causing organisms and spores are killed by Oxygen, the free Oxygen H2O2 releases is extremely effective at this. H2O2 will help eliminate existing infections and will help prevent future ones. It is also useful for suppressing algae growth. The free Oxygen atom will destroy dead organic material (i.e, leaves roots) in the system preventing them from rotting and spreading diseases.

Over Watering
Roots require Oxygen to breathe and low levels are the main cause of almost all root diseases. Both soil and hydroponic plants often fall prey to the same syndrome although it is rarely recognized as what it really is. Hydroponic crops often fail due to "root rot" and soil crops succumb to "over watering." The real cause of both these problems is a shortage of Oxygen at the root zone. In a soil system the soil consists of particles, a film of water on the particles and air spaces between the particles. When too much water is put into the soil the air spaces fill with liquid. The roots will quickly use up what Oxygen is dissolved in the water, if they haven't drunk enough of the liquid to allow air back in to the soil spaces they will stop working. In this situation roots will start dying within twenty-four hours. As the roots die the plants ability to drink water and nutrients will decrease, this will cause symptoms of nutrient deficiencies (mostly pale, slow, weak growth), and strangely they will start to wilt like they don't have enough water. It is easy to make a fatal mistake at this point and add more water.

In a Hydroponic system the cause is a more direct simple lack of oxygen in the solution; this may be from inadequate circulation and/or aeration. High reservoir temperatures also interfere with Oxygen's ability to dissolve in the water. Temperatures above 70F (20C) will eventually cause problems, 62F-65F (16C-18C) is recommended. The same symptoms will appear as with soil plants but you can also check the roots. Healthy roots should be mostly white with maybe a slight yellowish tan tinge. If they are a brownish color with dead tips or they easily pull away there is at least the beginning of a serious problem. An organic, ‘dirt like’ rotting smell means there is already a very good chance it is too late. As roots die and rot they eat Oxygen out of the water, as Oxygen levels are even further depleted more roots die, a viscous circle may be well under way. Reduced Oxygen levels and high temperatures both encourage anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The plants may still be saved but you will have to work fast.

How Hydrogen Peroxide prevents root rot/over watering.
When plants are watered with H2O2 it will break down and release Oxygen into the area around the roots. This helps stop the Oxygen from being depleted in the water filled air spaces until air can get back into them. High Oxygen levels at the roots will encourage rapid healthy root growth. In a Hydroponic system H2O2 will disperse through out the system and raise Oxygen levels as it breaks down. Strong white healthy roots with lots of fuzzy new growth will be visible. This fuzzy growth has massive surface area allowing for rapid absorption of the huge amounts of water and nutrients needed for rapid top growth. A healthy plant starts with a healthy root system.

How to use it.
H2O2 comes in several different strengths 3%, 5%, 8% and 35%, also sold as food grade Hydrogen Peroxide. The most economical is 35% which we recommend be diluted to three percent before using, as at this high concentration it can cause damage to skin and clothing. When working with food grade H2O2 it is very important that you clean up any spills or splashes immediately, it will damage almost anything very quickly. This is extra important with skin and clothing. Skin will be temporarily bleached pure white if not washed cleaned. Gloves are strongly recommended when working with any strong chemical.

Food grade H2O2 can be diluted to three percent by mixing it one part to eleven parts water (preferably distilled). The storage container should be opaque to prevent light from getting in and it must be able to hold some pressure. If three-liter pop bottles are available in your area they are ideal for mixing and storing H2O2. There are twelve quarter liters (250ml) in three liters, if you put in one quarter liter H2O2 and eleven quarter liters (250ml) water in the bottle it will full of three percent H2O2 and the bottle can hold the pressure that the H2O2 will generate. Three percent Hydrogen Peroxide may be added at up to three ml's per liter (2 1\2 tsp. Per gallon), but it is recommended that you start at a lower concentration and increase to full strength over a few weeks. Use every watering even on fresh cuttings. For hydroponics use every reservoir change and replace twenty-five percent (one quarter) every day. Example: In a 100L reservoir you would add three hundred ml's (3%) H2O2when changing the nutrient. You would then add seventy-five ml's more every day.

Where to get it.
35% food grade: called food grade because it has no toxic impurities. Of course your local hydroponics retailer, whom you can locate over the web.(there may be shipping restrictions on high strength peroxides). The local feed supplier may have it in small towns. Prices range from fifteen dollars per quarter liter to eighty dollars a gallon. One gallon will treat up to fifty thousand liters of water.

3%5%, 8% Can be found at most drugstores or pharmacies, prices start at a less than a dollar for a one hundred-ml bottle that will treat one hundred liters.

What to do if you already have root rot.

In Dirt:
Use peroxide water with an anti-fungicide and a high Phosphate fertilizer (9-45-15, 10-52-10, 0-60-0) for root growth. Or any other product with rooting hormone dissolved in it is helpful in regrowing roots and is strongly recommended. Water heavily until liquid pours out the bottom of the pot. This sound like bad idea, but it flushes out stagnant dead water and replaces it with fresh highly oxygenated water. Don't let plants sit in trays full of water, the soil will absorb this water and stay too wet. Don't water again until the pot feels light and the top inch or two of the soil are dry.

In Hydro:
Change your nutrients. Add H2O2 to the system. This will add oxygen and chemically eat dead roots. If roots are badly rotted and can be pulled away by hand you should pull them off. They are already dead and will only rot, causing further problems. Add a fungicide to kill any fungus that is probably present in the rotted tissue to prevent it from spreading. Increase aeration of the water, get an air pump and air stones, or more of them, for the reservoir. An air stone under every plant is usually very effective, but will require a larger air pump. Models that will do from forty to four hundred stones are available. Decrease the reservoir temperature, oxygen dissolves better in cold water and disease causing organisms reproduce slower as well. A good temperate range is 62F to 65F; anything above 70F will eventually cause a problem. It is also a good idea to remove any wilty plants from the system and put them on a separate reservoir so they don't infect plants that are still healthy.

Summary
The key to big productive plants is a big healthy root system and Hydrogen Peroxide is a great way to keep your roots healthy. It is a must to ensure the biggest best crops possible and to increase the chances of your plants thriving to harvest. Peroxide users will rarely lose plants or crops to root disease and will harvest larger and more consistent crops.
 

Icemud

Member of the Month: July 2012, July 2014 - Nug of the Month: July 2012
Here, if non of that other stuff works, sand and peroxide the lil bastards... it takes some commitment though:

Getting rid of the adults is a snap: simply give them a sticky yellow surface to land on, and within a few days you'll have enough dead adults to make a tasty dinner of gnat casserole (YMMV). The larvae are a bit trickier. The first step toward getting rid of them is to starve your plant of water for a few days, letting the top layers of soil dry completely. Larvae cannot develop in dry soil, though they can survive a drought by suspending their development. Don't worry about killing your plant; it takes serious dedication to kill most houseplants from underwatering, while overwatering a plant can kill it very quickly.

Once the soil is dry, mix 1 part hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with 4 parts water. Use 3% solution, which you can find in any drug store or in the hygiene/medicine aisle of a chain grocery store. You can use a stronger solution if you change the water mixture appropriately, and don't be too concerned with proportions; it would take a very high concentration of H2O2 to hurt your plants. Just make sure you buy pure H2O2 with no chemical additives! Hydrogen peroxide is often sold as a topical disinfectant, and things that are good for your wounds may not be so healthy for your plants.

Water your plants as you normally would, using the hydrogen peroxide solution and taking care to get good coverage of the entire top layer of soil. Use a spray bottle if desired. The soil will fizz for a few minutes after application; this is natural. The gnat larvae die on contact with the H2O2. After a few minutes the fizzing stops and the H2O2 breaks down into oxygen molecules (which your plants don't mind) and water molecules (which your plants love).

Congratulations! You've just successfully treated your fungus gnat infestation. Monitor the gnat population for a few days with sticky cards, in order to make sure you've got them all. Make sure not to overwater, and consider sometimes adding a little hydrogen peroxide to your daily waterings--in my experience, the plants react well to this little treat. Watch your plants grow big and strong and enjoy the fruits of your labors, whether they be flowers, vegetables, literal fruits, or big sticky nugs of homegrown chronic.

Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is a clear sharp smelling substance very similar in appearance to water (H2O). Like water it is made up of Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2), however H2O2 has an extra Oxygen atom in an unstable arrangement. It is this extra atom that gives H2O2 its useful properties. H2O2 has been used for many purposes including cleaning, bleaching, sterilizing, rocket fuel, animal feed treatment and in addition many miraculous claims about its health benefits have been made. This article isn't about any of these; instead it will concentrate on horticultural applications. H2O2 is of great use for both hydroponics and dirt/soilless gardening.

What Does Hydrogen Peroxide do?
H2O2 is an unstable molecule, when it breaks down a single oxygen atom and a molecule of water is released. This oxygen atom is extremely reactive and will attach itself to either another O- atom forming a stable Oxygen molecule or attack a nearby organic molecule. Both the stable and O- forms will increase the level of dissolved oxygen. This is the method by which H2O2 is beneficial. Pre treating the water supply with H2O2will drive out the Chlorine many cities use to sterilize it. This will also degrade any pesticides or herbicides that might be present as well as any other organic matter. Well water can be high in methane and organic sulfates, both of which H2O2 will remove. Many disease causing organisms and spores are killed by Oxygen, the free Oxygen H2O2 releases is extremely effective at this. H2O2 will help eliminate existing infections and will help prevent future ones. It is also useful for suppressing algae growth. The free Oxygen atom will destroy dead organic material (i.e, leaves roots) in the system preventing them from rotting and spreading diseases.

Over Watering
Roots require Oxygen to breathe and low levels are the main cause of almost all root diseases. Both soil and hydroponic plants often fall prey to the same syndrome although it is rarely recognized as what it really is. Hydroponic crops often fail due to "root rot" and soil crops succumb to "over watering." The real cause of both these problems is a shortage of Oxygen at the root zone. In a soil system the soil consists of particles, a film of water on the particles and air spaces between the particles. When too much water is put into the soil the air spaces fill with liquid. The roots will quickly use up what Oxygen is dissolved in the water, if they haven't drunk enough of the liquid to allow air back in to the soil spaces they will stop working. In this situation roots will start dying within twenty-four hours. As the roots die the plants ability to drink water and nutrients will decrease, this will cause symptoms of nutrient deficiencies (mostly pale, slow, weak growth), and strangely they will start to wilt like they don't have enough water. It is easy to make a fatal mistake at this point and add more water.

In a Hydroponic system the cause is a more direct simple lack of oxygen in the solution; this may be from inadequate circulation and/or aeration. High reservoir temperatures also interfere with Oxygen's ability to dissolve in the water. Temperatures above 70F (20C) will eventually cause problems, 62F-65F (16C-18C) is recommended. The same symptoms will appear as with soil plants but you can also check the roots. Healthy roots should be mostly white with maybe a slight yellowish tan tinge. If they are a brownish color with dead tips or they easily pull away there is at least the beginning of a serious problem. An organic, 'dirt like' rotting smell means there is already a very good chance it is too late. As roots die and rot they eat Oxygen out of the water, as Oxygen levels are even further depleted more roots die, a viscous circle may be well under way. Reduced Oxygen levels and high temperatures both encourage anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The plants may still be saved but you will have to work fast.

How Hydrogen Peroxide prevents root rot/over watering.
When plants are watered with H2O2 it will break down and release Oxygen into the area around the roots. This helps stop the Oxygen from being depleted in the water filled air spaces until air can get back into them. High Oxygen levels at the roots will encourage rapid healthy root growth. In a Hydroponic system H2O2 will disperse through out the system and raise Oxygen levels as it breaks down. Strong white healthy roots with lots of fuzzy new growth will be visible. This fuzzy growth has massive surface area allowing for rapid absorption of the huge amounts of water and nutrients needed for rapid top growth. A healthy plant starts with a healthy root system.

How to use it.
H2O2 comes in several different strengths 3%, 5%, 8% and 35%, also sold as food grade Hydrogen Peroxide. The most economical is 35% which we recommend be diluted to three percent before using, as at this high concentration it can cause damage to skin and clothing. When working with food grade H2O2 it is very important that you clean up any spills or splashes immediately, it will damage almost anything very quickly. This is extra important with skin and clothing. Skin will be temporarily bleached pure white if not washed cleaned. Gloves are strongly recommended when working with any strong chemical.

Food grade H2O2 can be diluted to three percent by mixing it one part to eleven parts water (preferably distilled). The storage container should be opaque to prevent light from getting in and it must be able to hold some pressure. If three-liter pop bottles are available in your area they are ideal for mixing and storing H2O2. There are twelve quarter liters (250ml) in three liters, if you put in one quarter liter H2O2 and eleven quarter liters (250ml) water in the bottle it will full of three percent H2O2 and the bottle can hold the pressure that the H2O2 will generate. Three percent Hydrogen Peroxide may be added at up to three ml's per liter (2 1\2 tsp. Per gallon), but it is recommended that you start at a lower concentration and increase to full strength over a few weeks. Use every watering even on fresh cuttings. For hydroponics use every reservoir change and replace twenty-five percent (one quarter) every day. Example: In a 100L reservoir you would add three hundred ml's (3%) H2O2when changing the nutrient. You would then add seventy-five ml's more every day.

Where to get it.
35% food grade: called food grade because it has no toxic impurities. Of course your local hydroponics retailer, whom you can locate over the web.(there may be shipping restrictions on high strength peroxides). The local feed supplier may have it in small towns. Prices range from fifteen dollars per quarter liter to eighty dollars a gallon. One gallon will treat up to fifty thousand liters of water.

3%5%, 8% Can be found at most drugstores or pharmacies, prices start at a less than a dollar for a one hundred-ml bottle that will treat one hundred liters.

What to do if you already have root rot.

In Dirt:
Use peroxide water with an anti-fungicide and a high Phosphate fertilizer (9-45-15, 10-52-10, 0-60-0) for root growth. Or any other product with rooting hormone dissolved in it is helpful in regrowing roots and is strongly recommended. Water heavily until liquid pours out the bottom of the pot. This sound like bad idea, but it flushes out stagnant dead water and replaces it with fresh highly oxygenated water. Don't let plants sit in trays full of water, the soil will absorb this water and stay too wet. Don't water again until the pot feels light and the top inch or two of the soil are dry.

In Hydro:
Change your nutrients. Add H2O2 to the system. This will add oxygen and chemically eat dead roots. If roots are badly rotted and can be pulled away by hand you should pull them off. They are already dead and will only rot, causing further problems. Add a fungicide to kill any fungus that is probably present in the rotted tissue to prevent it from spreading. Increase aeration of the water, get an air pump and air stones, or more of them, for the reservoir. An air stone under every plant is usually very effective, but will require a larger air pump. Models that will do from forty to four hundred stones are available. Decrease the reservoir temperature, oxygen dissolves better in cold water and disease causing organisms reproduce slower as well. A good temperate range is 62F to 65F; anything above 70F will eventually cause a problem. It is also a good idea to remove any wilty plants from the system and put them on a separate reservoir so they don't infect plants that are still healthy.

Summary
The key to big productive plants is a big healthy root system and Hydrogen Peroxide is a great way to keep your roots healthy. It is a must to ensure the biggest best crops possible and to increase the chances of your plants thriving to harvest. Peroxide users will rarely lose plants or crops to root disease and will harvest larger and more consistent crops.

Very good info on here about H2O2 but also you should mention that when growing with soil, especially organics....adding H2O2 will kill ALL of your micro bacterias in the soil, not just the bad ones....So If you do this with soil, make sure to add in a good organic tea feeding afterwords or adding a product like hygrowzyme and a good myco mix. Otherwise you will have a pest free and dead soil.....Before doing this I would suggest the steam method....works without killing off all of your good micro herds.... with fungus gnats, most of there larvae reside in the top 1 to 2" of soil so for me steaming the top layer worked great, no more gnats, and still have all my good soil bacterias and microbes.
 

hydrorod

New Member
Icemud and captain Kronic, thanks for your opinions. I'm sure they will help get rid of the little bastards. Of all the pests to choose from gnats must be the most annoying besides destructive to my crop. Never have this problem with hydroponics. Thanks again for your help.
 

Icemud

Member of the Month: July 2012, July 2014 - Nug of the Month: July 2012
Icemud and captain Kronic, thanks for your opinions. I'm sure they will help get rid of the little bastards. Of all the pests to choose from gnats must be the most annoying besides destructive to my crop. Never have this problem with hydroponics. Thanks again for your help.

I agree...these little mofo's are pains in the butt!!! Try the steam method on the top of the soil....that is if you have a hot iron (with steam production) or a clothes steamer....It works instantly...and theres nothing more gratifying than seeing these little fu##ers die instantly in misery...lol!! can you tell I have a deep hate for fungus gnats...lol... Just use a spoon and gently loosen the top 1 to 2 inches of soil...right to where you start seeing heavy root growth...with each turn of the soil...give the turned soil a good 5 to 10 second blast of steam...you will watch the larvae just wriggle a little and die where they squirm.... it takes a while but I saw 100% death to all of the larvae I did this too... The Azamax and mosquito dunks work awesome together and from now on I will be using a little bit of each with every other feeding from veg on.... this stuff works so good I even found 1 dead adult fungus gnat resting in peace on one of my fan leaves...haven't seen any since the treatments...

Good luck with battling these little bits of evil!! stay vigilant and remember that there cycle is about 30 days so use 2 to 3 attacks at least, for a few week period...and get yellow stickys...they work great!!
 

Icemud

Member of the Month: July 2012, July 2014 - Nug of the Month: July 2012
+rep... good looking out!
I was looking into that but you beat me to it...
I understand that peeps have good luck just using a good layer of sand on top of the soil... smother the lil bastards... they can't get through it apparently!

I've read about successes with sand, per-lite and also DE (diatemaceious earth) on the top of the soil....I have read with sand though, it will also limit the amount of oxygen that is supplied to the micro herds and soil if too much is applied though so be careful...also a side note...I read to use planting or playground sand (sterilized) and never use saltwater beach sand...(too much salt). I have never used this method and this is just compiled from what I have read....

The DE is supposed to be very lightly powdered on the top of the soil and due to its microscopic razor sharp edges, it cuts the hell out of the larvae squirming around in the soil and kills them... From what I have read, there are a few different kinds of DE and some are very hazerdous to your health, so if you choose this route, I would read up on what kind to use and how much...and wear eye and breathing protection when applying...

I also read that per-lite can be added to the top of the soil as well to discourage the adults from laying eggs in the soil. From what I read the adults are very weak creatures and they have a hard time burrowing into non wet, organic materials to lay eggs. I again have not used this method but have read success stories on its benefits....

sorry about the double post, just forgot to mention a few things that I have learned in all of my reading about killing these things....Best of luck to you!!!
 

McCrackin

New Member
I now cover my pots with plastic wrap from the start, so the stem pokes out of the wrapped packages. This seems to keep them from reinfesting after a soil drench.

This process requires attention to moisture and ph though... Because you make are making the soil part of the pots a mini eco-system.
 

Icemud

Member of the Month: July 2012, July 2014 - Nug of the Month: July 2012
I now cover my pots with plastic wrap from the start, so the stem pokes out of the wrapped packages. This seems to keep them from reinfesting after a soil drench.

This process requires attention to moisture and ph though... Because you make are making the soil part of the pots a mini eco-system.

Good idea McCrackin!!! I was thinking about doing somthing similar and using some pantyhose or some kind of fine netting to do the same....
 
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